The Effects of an Implemental Mind-Set on Attitude Strength

Marlone D. Henderson, Yaël de Liver, Peter M. Gollwitzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors investigated whether an implemental mind-set fosters stronger attitudes. Participants who made a decision about how to act (vs. those who held off) expressed a more extreme attitude toward an issue unrelated to the decision (Experiment 1). Participants who planned the implementation of a decision (vs. deliberated vs. control) exhibited less ambivalent (Experiment 2) and more accessible (Experiment 3) attitudes toward various objects unrelated to the decision. Moreover, an attitude reported by planning participants better predicted self-reported behavior 1 week later (Experiment 4). Finally, results suggest that the effect of an implemental mind-set on attitude strength toward unrelated objects is driven by a focus on information that supports an already-made decision (Experiment 5). Implications for attitudes, goals, and mind-sets are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-411
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume94
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

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experiment
planning

Keywords

  • accessibility
  • ambivalence
  • attitude strength
  • extremity
  • mind-set

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

The Effects of an Implemental Mind-Set on Attitude Strength. / Henderson, Marlone D.; de Liver, Yaël; Gollwitzer, Peter M.

In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 94, No. 3, 03.2008, p. 396-411.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Henderson, Marlone D. ; de Liver, Yaël ; Gollwitzer, Peter M. / The Effects of an Implemental Mind-Set on Attitude Strength. In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2008 ; Vol. 94, No. 3. pp. 396-411.
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