The effect of patient-provider communication on medication adherence in hypertensive black patients: Does race concordance matter?

Antoinette Schoenthaler, John P. Allegrante, William Chaplin, Gbenga Ogedegbe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Despite evidence of a positive effect of collaborative patient-provider communication on patient outcomes, our understanding of this relationship is unclear. Purpose The purpose of this paper is to determine whether racial composition of the relationship modified the association between ratings of provider communication and medication adherence. Methods Effect modification of the communication-adherence association, by racial composition of the relationship, was evaluated using general linear mixed models while adjusting for selected covariates. Results Three hundred ninety patients were in raceconcordant (black patient, black provider) relationships, while 207 were in race-discordant (black patient, white provider) relationships. The communication-adherence association was significantly modified in race-discordant relationships (p00.04). Communication rated as more collaborative in race-discordant relationships was associated with better adherence, while communication rated as less collaborative was associated with poor adherence. There was no significant association between adherence and communication in race-concordant relationships (p00.24). Conclusions Collaborative patient-provider communication may play an influential role in black patients' adherence behaviors when receiving care from white providers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-382
Number of pages11
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Medication Adherence
Communication
Patient Compliance
Linear Models

Keywords

  • Communication
  • Hypertension
  • Medication adherence
  • Race concordance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The effect of patient-provider communication on medication adherence in hypertensive black patients : Does race concordance matter? / Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Allegrante, John P.; Chaplin, William; Ogedegbe, Gbenga.

In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 43, No. 3, 06.2012, p. 372-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d3ad0daa069c45f282e9980f0c2462d9,
title = "The effect of patient-provider communication on medication adherence in hypertensive black patients: Does race concordance matter?",
abstract = "Background Despite evidence of a positive effect of collaborative patient-provider communication on patient outcomes, our understanding of this relationship is unclear. Purpose The purpose of this paper is to determine whether racial composition of the relationship modified the association between ratings of provider communication and medication adherence. Methods Effect modification of the communication-adherence association, by racial composition of the relationship, was evaluated using general linear mixed models while adjusting for selected covariates. Results Three hundred ninety patients were in raceconcordant (black patient, black provider) relationships, while 207 were in race-discordant (black patient, white provider) relationships. The communication-adherence association was significantly modified in race-discordant relationships (p00.04). Communication rated as more collaborative in race-discordant relationships was associated with better adherence, while communication rated as less collaborative was associated with poor adherence. There was no significant association between adherence and communication in race-concordant relationships (p00.24). Conclusions Collaborative patient-provider communication may play an influential role in black patients' adherence behaviors when receiving care from white providers.",
keywords = "Communication, Hypertension, Medication adherence, Race concordance",
author = "Antoinette Schoenthaler and Allegrante, {John P.} and William Chaplin and Gbenga Ogedegbe",
year = "2012",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1007/s12160-011-9342-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "372--382",
journal = "Annals of Behavioral Medicine",
issn = "0883-6612",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of patient-provider communication on medication adherence in hypertensive black patients

T2 - Does race concordance matter?

AU - Schoenthaler, Antoinette

AU - Allegrante, John P.

AU - Chaplin, William

AU - Ogedegbe, Gbenga

PY - 2012/6

Y1 - 2012/6

N2 - Background Despite evidence of a positive effect of collaborative patient-provider communication on patient outcomes, our understanding of this relationship is unclear. Purpose The purpose of this paper is to determine whether racial composition of the relationship modified the association between ratings of provider communication and medication adherence. Methods Effect modification of the communication-adherence association, by racial composition of the relationship, was evaluated using general linear mixed models while adjusting for selected covariates. Results Three hundred ninety patients were in raceconcordant (black patient, black provider) relationships, while 207 were in race-discordant (black patient, white provider) relationships. The communication-adherence association was significantly modified in race-discordant relationships (p00.04). Communication rated as more collaborative in race-discordant relationships was associated with better adherence, while communication rated as less collaborative was associated with poor adherence. There was no significant association between adherence and communication in race-concordant relationships (p00.24). Conclusions Collaborative patient-provider communication may play an influential role in black patients' adherence behaviors when receiving care from white providers.

AB - Background Despite evidence of a positive effect of collaborative patient-provider communication on patient outcomes, our understanding of this relationship is unclear. Purpose The purpose of this paper is to determine whether racial composition of the relationship modified the association between ratings of provider communication and medication adherence. Methods Effect modification of the communication-adherence association, by racial composition of the relationship, was evaluated using general linear mixed models while adjusting for selected covariates. Results Three hundred ninety patients were in raceconcordant (black patient, black provider) relationships, while 207 were in race-discordant (black patient, white provider) relationships. The communication-adherence association was significantly modified in race-discordant relationships (p00.04). Communication rated as more collaborative in race-discordant relationships was associated with better adherence, while communication rated as less collaborative was associated with poor adherence. There was no significant association between adherence and communication in race-concordant relationships (p00.24). Conclusions Collaborative patient-provider communication may play an influential role in black patients' adherence behaviors when receiving care from white providers.

KW - Communication

KW - Hypertension

KW - Medication adherence

KW - Race concordance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84863914871&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84863914871&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s12160-011-9342-5

DO - 10.1007/s12160-011-9342-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 22270266

AN - SCOPUS:84863914871

VL - 43

SP - 372

EP - 382

JO - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

JF - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

SN - 0883-6612

IS - 3

ER -