The effect of different surgical drilling procedures on full laser-etched microgrooves surface-treated implants

An experimental study in sheep

Ryo Jimbo, Nick Tovar, Daniel Y. Yoo, Malvin N. Janal, Rodolfo B. Anchieta, Paulo Coelho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the influence of instrumentation technique on the early osseointegration histomorphometrics and biomechanical fixation of fully laser-etched microgrooves implant surfaces in a sheep model. Material and Methods: Six sheep were subjected to bilateral hip surgeries 3 and 6 weeks before euthanasia. A total of 48 implants (∅4.5 mm, 8 mm in length) were distributed among four sites (8 per animal) and placed in bone sites drilled to 4.6 mm (reamer), 4.1 mm (loose), 3.7 mm (medium) and 3.2 mm (tight) in diameter. After healing, the animals were euthanized and half of the implants were biomechanically tested, while the remainder was subjected to non-decalcified histologic processing. The histomorphometric parameters assessed were bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO). Statistical analysis was performed using a mixed-model analysis of variance with significance level set at P < 0.05. Results: A general increasing trend is present from 3 to 6 weeks for most of the variables. The groups prepared to be press fit seemed to present higher values, which were maintained throughout the observation period. The reamer group presented the lowest BIC probably due to the drilling technique; however qualitatively, more new bone seemed to be in contact to the implant surface, at 3 weeks, whereas the implants placed in press-fit situations were mainly supported by cortical bone. Conclusion: The laser-etched microgrooved implant presented osteoconductive and biocompatible properties for all surgical procedures tested. However, procedures providing increasingly higher press-fit scenarios presented the strongest histomorphometric and biomechanical responses at 3 and 6 weeks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1072-1077
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Oral Implants Research
Volume25
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Experimental Implants
Sheep
Lasers
Bone and Bones
Osseointegration
Euthanasia
Hip
Analysis of Variance
Observation

Keywords

  • Histology
  • Implant surface
  • Laser etching
  • Osseointegration
  • Removal torque

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

The effect of different surgical drilling procedures on full laser-etched microgrooves surface-treated implants : An experimental study in sheep. / Jimbo, Ryo; Tovar, Nick; Yoo, Daniel Y.; Janal, Malvin N.; Anchieta, Rodolfo B.; Coelho, Paulo.

In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, Vol. 25, No. 9, 2014, p. 1072-1077.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jimbo, Ryo ; Tovar, Nick ; Yoo, Daniel Y. ; Janal, Malvin N. ; Anchieta, Rodolfo B. ; Coelho, Paulo. / The effect of different surgical drilling procedures on full laser-etched microgrooves surface-treated implants : An experimental study in sheep. In: Clinical Oral Implants Research. 2014 ; Vol. 25, No. 9. pp. 1072-1077.
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