The effect of caffeine as an ergogenic aid in anaerobic exercise

Kathleen Woolf, Wendy K. Bidwell, Amanda G. Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The study examined caffeine (5 mg/kg body weight) vs. placebo during anaerobic exercise. Eighteen male athletes (24.1 ± 5.8 yr; BMI 26.4 ± 2.2 kg/m2) completed a leg press, chest press, and Wingate test. During the caffeine trial, more total weight was lifted with the chest press, and a greater peak power was obtained during the Wingate test. No differences were observed between treatments for the leg press and average power, minimum power, and power drop (Wingate test). There was a significant treatment main effect found for postexercise glucose and insulin concentrations; higher concentrations were found in the caffeine trial. A significant interaction effect (treatment and time) was found for cortisol and glucose concentrations; both increased with caffeine and decreased with placebo. Postexercise systolic blood pressure was significantly higher during the caffeine trial. No differences were found between treatments for serum free-fatty-acid concentrations, plasma lactate concentrations, serum cortisol concentrations, heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion. Thus, a moderate dose of caffeine resulted in more total weight lifted for the chest press and a greater peak power attained during the Wingate test in competitive athletes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-429
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
Volume18
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 2008

Fingerprint

Caffeine
Exercise
Thorax
Athletes
Hydrocortisone
Leg
Placebos
Blood Pressure
Weights and Measures
Glucose
Therapeutics
Serum
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Lactic Acid
Heart Rate
Body Weight
Insulin

Keywords

  • Exercise metabolites
  • Hormonal responses
  • Physiological responses
  • RPE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

The effect of caffeine as an ergogenic aid in anaerobic exercise. / Woolf, Kathleen; Bidwell, Wendy K.; Carlson, Amanda G.

In: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, Vol. 18, No. 4, 08.2008, p. 412-429.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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