The effect of a cardiovascular educational intervention on healthcare utilization and costs

Amar C. Nawathe, Sharon Glied, William S. Weintraub, Lori J. Mosca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate healthcare utilization and costs following a cardiovascular disease (CVD) screening and educational special intervention (SI) compared with a control intervention (CIN) at 1 year in the Family-Based Intervention Trial for Heart Health. Study Design: Participants randomized to SI for screening and periodic lifestyle counseling were compared with participants randomized to CIN for resource utilization and associated costs at 1 year. Methods: A total of 421 participants (67% women and 37% minorities) were healthy family members of hospitalized patients with CVD who had 1-year follow-up resource utilization data. Resource utilization was systematically measured using a standardized questionnaire in both study groups and was validated by medical records in a subsample. Outcomes included provider visits, diagnostic studies, laboratory assessment, medication use, behavioral program enrollment, emergency department (ED) visits, hospital admissions, and healthcare costs. Results: At 1 year, there were significantly fewer overall provider visits (P = .04) and psychiatrist visits (P = .03) in SI versus CIN. There was a nonsignificant trend toward fewer ED visits, decreased hospital admissions, and shorter inpatient length of stay in SI versus CIN. Estimated healthcare expenditures for CIN exceeded those for SI by $590 per participant. The cost of the 1-year intervention was $95 per participant. Conclusions: A 1-year standardized low-cost screening and educational intervention was associated with significantly fewer provider visits and with a nonsignificant trend toward reduced healthcare utilization for several parameters. The long-term effect on outcomes and costs deserves further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-346
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Managed Care
Volume16
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 2010

Fingerprint

Health Care Costs
Costs and Cost Analysis
Hospital Emergency Service
Cardiovascular Diseases
Delivery of Health Care
Hospital Costs
Health Expenditures
Medical Records
Psychiatry
Life Style
Counseling
Inpatients
Length of Stay
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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The effect of a cardiovascular educational intervention on healthcare utilization and costs. / Nawathe, Amar C.; Glied, Sharon; Weintraub, William S.; Mosca, Lori J.

In: American Journal of Managed Care, Vol. 16, No. 5, 05.2010, p. 339-346.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nawathe, Amar C. ; Glied, Sharon ; Weintraub, William S. ; Mosca, Lori J. / The effect of a cardiovascular educational intervention on healthcare utilization and costs. In: American Journal of Managed Care. 2010 ; Vol. 16, No. 5. pp. 339-346.
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