The eel retina. Ganglion cell classes and spatial mechanisms

Robert Shapley, J. Gordon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have been able to separate optic fibers in the eye of the eel Anguilla rostrata into two distinct classes on the basis of spatial summation properties. X fibers, the first class, are like X ganglion cells in the cat: they have null positions for contrast reversal sine gratings; they respond at the modulation frequency; and many have a strong surround mechanism. ̄X fibers, the second class, respond with an 'on-off' response to local stimulation, to diffuse light modulation, to coarse drifting gratings, and to contrast reversal gratings. We have put forward a model for the receptive field of ̄X fibers which involves two subunits, with rectification before the subunits add their signals. This model accounts for many of the quirks of ̄X fibers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-155
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of General Physiology
Volume71
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1978

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Anguilla
Eels
Ganglia
Retina
Cats
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

The eel retina. Ganglion cell classes and spatial mechanisms. / Shapley, Robert; Gordon, J.

In: Journal of General Physiology, Vol. 71, No. 2, 1978, p. 139-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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