The economic value of teeth

Sharon Glied, Matthew Neidell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper examines the effect of oral health on labor market outcomes by exploiting variation in fluoridated water exposure during childhood. The politics surrounding the adoption of water fluoridation by local governments suggests exposure to fluoride is exogenous to other factors affecting earnings. Exposure to fluoridated water increases women's earnings by approximately 4 percent, but has no detectable effect for men. Furthermore, the effect is largely concentrated amongst women from families of low socioeconomic status. We find little evidence to support occupational sorting, statistical discrimination, and productivity as potential channels, with some evidence supporting consumer and possibly employer discrimination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)468-496
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Human Resources
Volume45
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

Economics
Fluoridation
Water
Sorting
Productivity
Health
Personnel
Economic value
Statistical discrimination
Socioeconomic status
Childhood
Discrimination
Local government
Oral health
Employers
Labor market outcomes
Factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Strategy and Management
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Glied, S., & Neidell, M. (2010). The economic value of teeth. Journal of Human Resources, 45(2), 468-496.

The economic value of teeth. / Glied, Sharon; Neidell, Matthew.

In: Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 45, No. 2, 03.2010, p. 468-496.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Glied, S & Neidell, M 2010, 'The economic value of teeth', Journal of Human Resources, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 468-496.
Glied S, Neidell M. The economic value of teeth. Journal of Human Resources. 2010 Mar;45(2):468-496.
Glied, Sharon ; Neidell, Matthew. / The economic value of teeth. In: Journal of Human Resources. 2010 ; Vol. 45, No. 2. pp. 468-496.
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