The Drosophila circadian clock

What we know and what we don't know

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Circadian rhythms are regulated by endogenous body clocks, which are formed by rhythmic cycles of clock gene expression. Almost all reviews of the Drosophila circadian clock state that the intracellular oscillator is based on a simple negative feedback loop. However, not many 'simple' feedback loops in biology last for 24 h. Instead, the Drosophila clock is a series of precisely timed steps that are deliberately slow. In this paper, I will discuss the current model for how the Drosophila clock is regulated, and ask what questions remain to be answered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-293
Number of pages7
JournalSeminars in Cell and Developmental Biology
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Circadian Clocks
Drosophila
Circadian Rhythm
Gene Expression

Keywords

  • dClock
  • Double-time
  • Drosophila
  • Period

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

The Drosophila circadian clock : What we know and what we don't know. / Blau, Justin.

In: Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology, Vol. 12, No. 4, 2001, p. 287-293.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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