The down-market trend in housing production in Bangkok, 1980-87

Shlomo Angel, S. Chuated

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The private sector in Thailand moved into construction of housing for low-income people in 1986, initiating at least 37 new projects which offered housing at prices ranging from 150 000 to 250 000 Baht. A sales office survey was conducted in all these projects, as part of the Bangkok Land Management Study. A comparison of rates of sale shows that low-cost houses are now selling three times as fast as other land-and-house packages on the market. If we assume that new home buyers are willing to pay 25% of total household income for housing, then households with a monthly income of 6000 Baht can now afford a house in Bangkok. A comparison with conditions in the housing market in 1980 shows that at that time, almost no household with a monthly income of less than 10 000 Baht could afford a house produced by the private sector. One-third of the population living in slums can now afford to own a small house in the suburbs. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalThird World Planning Review
Volume12
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1990

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housing
income
private sector
market
trend
slum
housing market
household income
sale
suburb
selling
land management
Thailand
sales
low income
costs
management
cost
project
household

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development

Cite this

The down-market trend in housing production in Bangkok, 1980-87. / Angel, Shlomo; Chuated, S.

In: Third World Planning Review, Vol. 12, No. 1, 1990, p. 1-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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