The dangers of dental devices as reported in the food and drug administration manufacturer and user facility device experience database

Nutan B. Hebballi, Rachel Ramoni, Elsbeth Kalenderian, Veronique F. Delattre, Denice C L Stewart, Karla Kent, Joel M. White, Ram Vaderhobli, Muhammad F. Walji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The authors conducted a study to determine the frequency and type of adverse events (AEs) associated with dental devices reported to the Food and Drug Administration Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database.Methods: The authors downloaded and reviewed the dental device-related AEs reported to MAUDE from January 1, 1996, through December 31, 2011.Results: MAUDE received a total of 1,978,056 reports between January 1, 1996, and December 31, 2011. Among these reports, 28,046 (1.4%) AE reports were associated with dental devices. Within the dental AE reports that had event type information, 17,261 reported injuries, 7,777 reported device malfunctions, and 66 reported deaths. Among the 66 entries classified as death reports, 52 reported a death in the description; the remaining were either misclassified or lacked sufficient information in the report to determine whether a death had occurred. Of the dental device-associated AEs, 53.5% pertained to endosseous implants.Conclusions: A plethora of devices are used in dental care. To achieve Element 1 of Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Patient Safety Initiative, clinicians and researchers must be able to monitor the safety of dental devices. AlthoughMAUDEwas identified by the authors as essentially the sole source of this valuable information on adverse events, their investigations led them to conclude that MAUDE had substantial limitations that prevent it from being the broad-based patient safety sentinel the profession requires.Practical Implications: As potential contributors to MAUDE, dental care teams play a key role in improving the profession's access to information about the safety of dental devices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-110
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Dental Association
Volume146
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

United States Food and Drug Administration
Tooth
Databases
Equipment and Supplies
Protective Devices
Dental Care
Patient Safety
Access to Information
Health Services Research
Research Personnel

Keywords

  • Dental equipment
  • Dental public health
  • Dental records
  • Informatics
  • Quality of care
  • Safety management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Hebballi, N. B., Ramoni, R., Kalenderian, E., Delattre, V. F., Stewart, D. C. L., Kent, K., ... Walji, M. F. (2015). The dangers of dental devices as reported in the food and drug administration manufacturer and user facility device experience database. Journal of the American Dental Association, 146(2), 102-110.

The dangers of dental devices as reported in the food and drug administration manufacturer and user facility device experience database. / Hebballi, Nutan B.; Ramoni, Rachel; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Delattre, Veronique F.; Stewart, Denice C L; Kent, Karla; White, Joel M.; Vaderhobli, Ram; Walji, Muhammad F.

In: Journal of the American Dental Association, Vol. 146, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 102-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hebballi, NB, Ramoni, R, Kalenderian, E, Delattre, VF, Stewart, DCL, Kent, K, White, JM, Vaderhobli, R & Walji, MF 2015, 'The dangers of dental devices as reported in the food and drug administration manufacturer and user facility device experience database', Journal of the American Dental Association, vol. 146, no. 2, pp. 102-110.
Hebballi, Nutan B. ; Ramoni, Rachel ; Kalenderian, Elsbeth ; Delattre, Veronique F. ; Stewart, Denice C L ; Kent, Karla ; White, Joel M. ; Vaderhobli, Ram ; Walji, Muhammad F. / The dangers of dental devices as reported in the food and drug administration manufacturer and user facility device experience database. In: Journal of the American Dental Association. 2015 ; Vol. 146, No. 2. pp. 102-110.
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