The Continuum of Maternal Sepsis Severity: Incidence and Risk Factors in a Population-Based Cohort Study

Colleen D. Acosta, Marian Knight, Henry C. Lee, Jennifer J. Kurinczuk, Jeffrey B. Gould, Audrey Lyndon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective:To investigate the incidence and risk factors associated with uncomplicated maternal sepsis and progression to severe sepsis in a large population-based birth cohort.Methods:This retrospective cohort study used linked hospital discharge and vital statistics records data for 1,622,474 live births in California during 2005-2007. Demographic and clinical factors were adjusted using multivariable logistic regression with robust standard errors.Results:1598 mothers developed sepsis; incidence of all sepsis was 10 per 10,000 live births (95% CI = 9.4-10.3). Women had significantly increased adjusted odds (aOR) of developing sepsis if they were older (25-34 years: aOR = 1.29; ≥35 years: aOR = 1.41), had ≤high-school education (aOR = 1.63), public/no-insurance (aOR = 1.22) or a cesarean section (primary: aOR = 1.99; repeat: aOR = 1.25). 791 women progressed to severe sepsis; incidence of severe sepsis was 4.9 per 10,000 live births (95% CI = 4.5-5.2). Women had significantly increased adjusted odds of progressing to severe sepsis if they were Black (aOR = 2.09), Asian (aOR = 1.59), Hispanic (aOR = 1.42), had public/no-insurance (aOR = 1.52), delivered in hospitals with <1,000 births/year (aOR = 1.93), were primiparous (aOR = 2.03), had a multiple birth (aOR = 3.5), diabetes (aOR = 1.47), or chronic hypertension (aOR = 8.51). Preeclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage were also significantly associated with progression to severe sepsis (aOR = 3.72; aOR = 4.18). For every cumulative factor, risk of uncomplicated sepsis increased by 25% (95% CI = 17.4-32.3) and risk of progression to severe sepsis/septic shock increased by 57% (95% CI = 40.8-74.4).Conclusions:The rate of severe sepsis was approximately twice the 1991-2003 national estimate. Risk factors identified are relevant to obstetric practice given their cumulative risk effect and the apparent increase in severe sepsis incidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere67175
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume8
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 2013

Fingerprint

sepsis (infection)
cohort studies
Sepsis
Cohort Studies
risk factors
Mothers
incidence
Incidence
Population
Insurance
Obstetrics
Live Birth
Medical problems
insurance
Logistics
Education
Statistics
cumulative risk
demographic statistics
secondary education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The Continuum of Maternal Sepsis Severity : Incidence and Risk Factors in a Population-Based Cohort Study. / Acosta, Colleen D.; Knight, Marian; Lee, Henry C.; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J.; Gould, Jeffrey B.; Lyndon, Audrey.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 8, No. 7, e67175, 02.07.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Acosta, Colleen D. ; Knight, Marian ; Lee, Henry C. ; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J. ; Gould, Jeffrey B. ; Lyndon, Audrey. / The Continuum of Maternal Sepsis Severity : Incidence and Risk Factors in a Population-Based Cohort Study. In: PLoS ONE. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 7.
@article{a1c1e4db65e34fdca53091f4fbcd80d4,
title = "The Continuum of Maternal Sepsis Severity: Incidence and Risk Factors in a Population-Based Cohort Study",
abstract = "Objective:To investigate the incidence and risk factors associated with uncomplicated maternal sepsis and progression to severe sepsis in a large population-based birth cohort.Methods:This retrospective cohort study used linked hospital discharge and vital statistics records data for 1,622,474 live births in California during 2005-2007. Demographic and clinical factors were adjusted using multivariable logistic regression with robust standard errors.Results:1598 mothers developed sepsis; incidence of all sepsis was 10 per 10,000 live births (95{\%} CI = 9.4-10.3). Women had significantly increased adjusted odds (aOR) of developing sepsis if they were older (25-34 years: aOR = 1.29; ≥35 years: aOR = 1.41), had ≤high-school education (aOR = 1.63), public/no-insurance (aOR = 1.22) or a cesarean section (primary: aOR = 1.99; repeat: aOR = 1.25). 791 women progressed to severe sepsis; incidence of severe sepsis was 4.9 per 10,000 live births (95{\%} CI = 4.5-5.2). Women had significantly increased adjusted odds of progressing to severe sepsis if they were Black (aOR = 2.09), Asian (aOR = 1.59), Hispanic (aOR = 1.42), had public/no-insurance (aOR = 1.52), delivered in hospitals with <1,000 births/year (aOR = 1.93), were primiparous (aOR = 2.03), had a multiple birth (aOR = 3.5), diabetes (aOR = 1.47), or chronic hypertension (aOR = 8.51). Preeclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage were also significantly associated with progression to severe sepsis (aOR = 3.72; aOR = 4.18). For every cumulative factor, risk of uncomplicated sepsis increased by 25{\%} (95{\%} CI = 17.4-32.3) and risk of progression to severe sepsis/septic shock increased by 57{\%} (95{\%} CI = 40.8-74.4).Conclusions:The rate of severe sepsis was approximately twice the 1991-2003 national estimate. Risk factors identified are relevant to obstetric practice given their cumulative risk effect and the apparent increase in severe sepsis incidence.",
author = "Acosta, {Colleen D.} and Marian Knight and Lee, {Henry C.} and Kurinczuk, {Jennifer J.} and Gould, {Jeffrey B.} and Audrey Lyndon",
year = "2013",
month = "7",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0067175",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Continuum of Maternal Sepsis Severity

T2 - Incidence and Risk Factors in a Population-Based Cohort Study

AU - Acosta, Colleen D.

AU - Knight, Marian

AU - Lee, Henry C.

AU - Kurinczuk, Jennifer J.

AU - Gould, Jeffrey B.

AU - Lyndon, Audrey

PY - 2013/7/2

Y1 - 2013/7/2

N2 - Objective:To investigate the incidence and risk factors associated with uncomplicated maternal sepsis and progression to severe sepsis in a large population-based birth cohort.Methods:This retrospective cohort study used linked hospital discharge and vital statistics records data for 1,622,474 live births in California during 2005-2007. Demographic and clinical factors were adjusted using multivariable logistic regression with robust standard errors.Results:1598 mothers developed sepsis; incidence of all sepsis was 10 per 10,000 live births (95% CI = 9.4-10.3). Women had significantly increased adjusted odds (aOR) of developing sepsis if they were older (25-34 years: aOR = 1.29; ≥35 years: aOR = 1.41), had ≤high-school education (aOR = 1.63), public/no-insurance (aOR = 1.22) or a cesarean section (primary: aOR = 1.99; repeat: aOR = 1.25). 791 women progressed to severe sepsis; incidence of severe sepsis was 4.9 per 10,000 live births (95% CI = 4.5-5.2). Women had significantly increased adjusted odds of progressing to severe sepsis if they were Black (aOR = 2.09), Asian (aOR = 1.59), Hispanic (aOR = 1.42), had public/no-insurance (aOR = 1.52), delivered in hospitals with <1,000 births/year (aOR = 1.93), were primiparous (aOR = 2.03), had a multiple birth (aOR = 3.5), diabetes (aOR = 1.47), or chronic hypertension (aOR = 8.51). Preeclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage were also significantly associated with progression to severe sepsis (aOR = 3.72; aOR = 4.18). For every cumulative factor, risk of uncomplicated sepsis increased by 25% (95% CI = 17.4-32.3) and risk of progression to severe sepsis/septic shock increased by 57% (95% CI = 40.8-74.4).Conclusions:The rate of severe sepsis was approximately twice the 1991-2003 national estimate. Risk factors identified are relevant to obstetric practice given their cumulative risk effect and the apparent increase in severe sepsis incidence.

AB - Objective:To investigate the incidence and risk factors associated with uncomplicated maternal sepsis and progression to severe sepsis in a large population-based birth cohort.Methods:This retrospective cohort study used linked hospital discharge and vital statistics records data for 1,622,474 live births in California during 2005-2007. Demographic and clinical factors were adjusted using multivariable logistic regression with robust standard errors.Results:1598 mothers developed sepsis; incidence of all sepsis was 10 per 10,000 live births (95% CI = 9.4-10.3). Women had significantly increased adjusted odds (aOR) of developing sepsis if they were older (25-34 years: aOR = 1.29; ≥35 years: aOR = 1.41), had ≤high-school education (aOR = 1.63), public/no-insurance (aOR = 1.22) or a cesarean section (primary: aOR = 1.99; repeat: aOR = 1.25). 791 women progressed to severe sepsis; incidence of severe sepsis was 4.9 per 10,000 live births (95% CI = 4.5-5.2). Women had significantly increased adjusted odds of progressing to severe sepsis if they were Black (aOR = 2.09), Asian (aOR = 1.59), Hispanic (aOR = 1.42), had public/no-insurance (aOR = 1.52), delivered in hospitals with <1,000 births/year (aOR = 1.93), were primiparous (aOR = 2.03), had a multiple birth (aOR = 3.5), diabetes (aOR = 1.47), or chronic hypertension (aOR = 8.51). Preeclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage were also significantly associated with progression to severe sepsis (aOR = 3.72; aOR = 4.18). For every cumulative factor, risk of uncomplicated sepsis increased by 25% (95% CI = 17.4-32.3) and risk of progression to severe sepsis/septic shock increased by 57% (95% CI = 40.8-74.4).Conclusions:The rate of severe sepsis was approximately twice the 1991-2003 national estimate. Risk factors identified are relevant to obstetric practice given their cumulative risk effect and the apparent increase in severe sepsis incidence.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84879750586&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84879750586&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0067175

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0067175

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 7

M1 - e67175

ER -