The continuum of long-term care in world cities: From institutionalization to home care

Gabriel Montero, Michael K. Gusmano, Victor G. Rodwin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Discussions of long-term care usually evoke images of " warehousing" frail older persons in nursing homes, hospitals, and other institutional settings. Most long-term care, however, is provided in the community. As the preceding chapters suggest, world cities have a particularly acute need for innovative solutions for the provision of long-term care. Large older populations face a diverse set of chronic conditions that require flexibility and tailored services difficult to provide in institutional settings. Moreover, specific urban characteristics such as limited land and higher population densities make for costly construction of long-term care facilities. As we show, the solution to some of these challenges is to use the existing housing stock and develop more home-care services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGrowing Older in World Cities
Subtitle of host publicationNew York, London, Paris, and Tokyo
PublisherVanderbilt University Press
Pages361-375
Number of pages15
ISBN (Print)0826514898, 9780826514899
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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    Montero, G., Gusmano, M. K., & Rodwin, V. G. (2006). The continuum of long-term care in world cities: From institutionalization to home care. In Growing Older in World Cities: New York, London, Paris, and Tokyo (pp. 361-375). Vanderbilt University Press.