The contact hypothesis revisited: Status bias in the reduction of implicit prejudice in the United States and Lebanon

Pj Henry, Curtis D. Hardin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although 50 years of research demonstrate that friendly intergroup contact reduces intergroup prejudice, the findings are based solely on self-reported, explicit prejudice. In two parallel experiments examining intergroup contact and prejudice - between Whites and Blacks in the United States (Experiment 1) and between Christians and Muslims in Lebanon (Experiment 2) - we examined whether intergroup status differences moderate contact effects on implicit prejudice, as well as explicit prejudice. Both experiments replicated the standard effect of contact on explicit prejudice. They also demonstrated that intergroup contact reduces implicit prejudice among low-status groups. In Experiment 1, the implicit prejudice of Blacks toward Whites (but not Whites toward Blacks) was reduced as a function of friendly contact. In Experiment 2, the implicit prejudice of Muslims toward Christians (but not Christians toward Muslims) was reduced as a function of friendly contact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)862-868
Number of pages7
JournalPsychological Science
Volume17
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006

Fingerprint

Lebanon
Islam

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

The contact hypothesis revisited : Status bias in the reduction of implicit prejudice in the United States and Lebanon. / Henry, Pj; Hardin, Curtis D.

In: Psychological Science, Vol. 17, No. 10, 01.10.2006, p. 862-868.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{450719a035f846d0a258e3093b7c0d36,
title = "The contact hypothesis revisited: Status bias in the reduction of implicit prejudice in the United States and Lebanon",
abstract = "Although 50 years of research demonstrate that friendly intergroup contact reduces intergroup prejudice, the findings are based solely on self-reported, explicit prejudice. In two parallel experiments examining intergroup contact and prejudice - between Whites and Blacks in the United States (Experiment 1) and between Christians and Muslims in Lebanon (Experiment 2) - we examined whether intergroup status differences moderate contact effects on implicit prejudice, as well as explicit prejudice. Both experiments replicated the standard effect of contact on explicit prejudice. They also demonstrated that intergroup contact reduces implicit prejudice among low-status groups. In Experiment 1, the implicit prejudice of Blacks toward Whites (but not Whites toward Blacks) was reduced as a function of friendly contact. In Experiment 2, the implicit prejudice of Muslims toward Christians (but not Christians toward Muslims) was reduced as a function of friendly contact.",
author = "Pj Henry and Hardin, {Curtis D.}",
year = "2006",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-9280.2006.01795.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "862--868",
journal = "Psychological Science",
issn = "0956-7976",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The contact hypothesis revisited

T2 - Status bias in the reduction of implicit prejudice in the United States and Lebanon

AU - Henry, Pj

AU - Hardin, Curtis D.

PY - 2006/10/1

Y1 - 2006/10/1

N2 - Although 50 years of research demonstrate that friendly intergroup contact reduces intergroup prejudice, the findings are based solely on self-reported, explicit prejudice. In two parallel experiments examining intergroup contact and prejudice - between Whites and Blacks in the United States (Experiment 1) and between Christians and Muslims in Lebanon (Experiment 2) - we examined whether intergroup status differences moderate contact effects on implicit prejudice, as well as explicit prejudice. Both experiments replicated the standard effect of contact on explicit prejudice. They also demonstrated that intergroup contact reduces implicit prejudice among low-status groups. In Experiment 1, the implicit prejudice of Blacks toward Whites (but not Whites toward Blacks) was reduced as a function of friendly contact. In Experiment 2, the implicit prejudice of Muslims toward Christians (but not Christians toward Muslims) was reduced as a function of friendly contact.

AB - Although 50 years of research demonstrate that friendly intergroup contact reduces intergroup prejudice, the findings are based solely on self-reported, explicit prejudice. In two parallel experiments examining intergroup contact and prejudice - between Whites and Blacks in the United States (Experiment 1) and between Christians and Muslims in Lebanon (Experiment 2) - we examined whether intergroup status differences moderate contact effects on implicit prejudice, as well as explicit prejudice. Both experiments replicated the standard effect of contact on explicit prejudice. They also demonstrated that intergroup contact reduces implicit prejudice among low-status groups. In Experiment 1, the implicit prejudice of Blacks toward Whites (but not Whites toward Blacks) was reduced as a function of friendly contact. In Experiment 2, the implicit prejudice of Muslims toward Christians (but not Christians toward Muslims) was reduced as a function of friendly contact.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33750804384&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33750804384&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2006.01795.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-9280.2006.01795.x

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 862

EP - 868

JO - Psychological Science

JF - Psychological Science

SN - 0956-7976

IS - 10

ER -