The Conceptual Basis of Antonymy and Synonymy in Adjectives

G. L. Murphy, J. M. Andrew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Four experiments investigated the nature of the lexical relations of synonymy and antonymy in adjectives. The experiments contrasted the hypothesis that these relations are a form of lexical association with the view that they have a conceptual basis. The results showed that the antonyms and synonyms provided to adjectives in isolation were often not the same as those provided to the same adjectives within a noun phrase. This effect of context is consistent with models of conceptual combination, but cannot be easily explained by lexical associations. Thus, the results support a conceptual basis of antonymy and synonymy. The specific responses given provide some insight into the process by which adjective and noun meanings are combined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)301-319
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Memory and Language
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1993

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experiment
social isolation
Experiments
Adjective
Synonymy
Antonymy
Experiment
Noun Phrase
Conceptual Combination
Antonyms
Nouns
Lexical Relations
Synonyms
Isolation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

The Conceptual Basis of Antonymy and Synonymy in Adjectives. / Murphy, G. L.; Andrew, J. M.

In: Journal of Memory and Language, Vol. 32, No. 3, 06.1993, p. 301-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murphy, G. L. ; Andrew, J. M. / The Conceptual Basis of Antonymy and Synonymy in Adjectives. In: Journal of Memory and Language. 1993 ; Vol. 32, No. 3. pp. 301-319.
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