The challenge of attribution

Responsibility for population health in the context of accountable care

Marc Gourevitch, Thomas Cannell, Jo Ivey Melville Boufford, Cynthia Summers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

One of the 3 goals for accountable care organizations is to improve population health. This will require that accountable care organizations bridge the schism between clinical care and public health. But do health care delivery organizations and public health agencies share a concept of " population"? We think not: whereas delivery systems define populations in terms of persons receiving care, public health agencies typically measure health on the basis of geography. This creates an attribution problem, particularly in large urban centers, where multiple health care providers often serve any given neighborhood. We suggest potential innovations that could allow urban accountable care organizations to accept accountability, and rewards, for measurably improving population health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume102
Issue numberSUPPL. 3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

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Accountable Care Organizations
Public Health
Health
Population
Geography
Social Responsibility
Reward
Health Personnel
Organizations
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The challenge of attribution : Responsibility for population health in the context of accountable care. / Gourevitch, Marc; Cannell, Thomas; Boufford, Jo Ivey Melville; Summers, Cynthia.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. SUPPL. 3, 06.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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