The Brazilian health system: History, advances, and challenges

Jairnilson Paim, Claudia Travassos, Celia Almeida, Ligia Bahia, James MacInko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Brazil is a country of continental dimensions with widespread regional and social inequalities. In this report, we examine the historical development and components of the Brazilian health system, focusing on the reform process during the past 40 years, including the creation of the Unified Health System. A defining characteristic of the contemporary health sector reform in Brazil is that it was driven by civil society rather than by governments, political parties, or international organisations. The advent of the Unified Health System increased access to health care for a substantial proportion of the Brazilian population, at a time when the system was becoming increasingly privatised. Much is still to be done if universal health care is to be achieved. Over the past 20 years, there have been other advances, including investments in human resources, science and technology, and primary care, and a substantial decentralisation process, widespread social participation, and growing public awareness of a right to health care. If the Brazilian health system is to overcome the challenges with which it is presently faced, strengthened political support is needed so that financing can be restructured and the roles of both the public and private sector can be redefined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1778-1797
Number of pages20
JournalThe Lancet
Volume377
Issue number9779
DOIs
StatePublished - May 21 2011

Fingerprint

History
Health
Brazil
Social Participation
Delivery of Health Care
Health Services Accessibility
Private Sector
Public Sector
Politics
Primary Health Care
Organizations
Technology
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Paim, J., Travassos, C., Almeida, C., Bahia, L., & MacInko, J. (2011). The Brazilian health system: History, advances, and challenges. The Lancet, 377(9779), 1778-1797. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60054-8

The Brazilian health system : History, advances, and challenges. / Paim, Jairnilson; Travassos, Claudia; Almeida, Celia; Bahia, Ligia; MacInko, James.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 377, No. 9779, 21.05.2011, p. 1778-1797.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paim, J, Travassos, C, Almeida, C, Bahia, L & MacInko, J 2011, 'The Brazilian health system: History, advances, and challenges', The Lancet, vol. 377, no. 9779, pp. 1778-1797. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60054-8
Paim J, Travassos C, Almeida C, Bahia L, MacInko J. The Brazilian health system: History, advances, and challenges. The Lancet. 2011 May 21;377(9779):1778-1797. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60054-8
Paim, Jairnilson ; Travassos, Claudia ; Almeida, Celia ; Bahia, Ligia ; MacInko, James. / The Brazilian health system : History, advances, and challenges. In: The Lancet. 2011 ; Vol. 377, No. 9779. pp. 1778-1797.
@article{1ba04189ffaa497389b5d697aa2f147a,
title = "The Brazilian health system: History, advances, and challenges",
abstract = "Brazil is a country of continental dimensions with widespread regional and social inequalities. In this report, we examine the historical development and components of the Brazilian health system, focusing on the reform process during the past 40 years, including the creation of the Unified Health System. A defining characteristic of the contemporary health sector reform in Brazil is that it was driven by civil society rather than by governments, political parties, or international organisations. The advent of the Unified Health System increased access to health care for a substantial proportion of the Brazilian population, at a time when the system was becoming increasingly privatised. Much is still to be done if universal health care is to be achieved. Over the past 20 years, there have been other advances, including investments in human resources, science and technology, and primary care, and a substantial decentralisation process, widespread social participation, and growing public awareness of a right to health care. If the Brazilian health system is to overcome the challenges with which it is presently faced, strengthened political support is needed so that financing can be restructured and the roles of both the public and private sector can be redefined.",
author = "Jairnilson Paim and Claudia Travassos and Celia Almeida and Ligia Bahia and James MacInko",
year = "2011",
month = "5",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60054-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "377",
pages = "1778--1797",
journal = "The Lancet",
issn = "0140-6736",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "9779",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Brazilian health system

T2 - History, advances, and challenges

AU - Paim, Jairnilson

AU - Travassos, Claudia

AU - Almeida, Celia

AU - Bahia, Ligia

AU - MacInko, James

PY - 2011/5/21

Y1 - 2011/5/21

N2 - Brazil is a country of continental dimensions with widespread regional and social inequalities. In this report, we examine the historical development and components of the Brazilian health system, focusing on the reform process during the past 40 years, including the creation of the Unified Health System. A defining characteristic of the contemporary health sector reform in Brazil is that it was driven by civil society rather than by governments, political parties, or international organisations. The advent of the Unified Health System increased access to health care for a substantial proportion of the Brazilian population, at a time when the system was becoming increasingly privatised. Much is still to be done if universal health care is to be achieved. Over the past 20 years, there have been other advances, including investments in human resources, science and technology, and primary care, and a substantial decentralisation process, widespread social participation, and growing public awareness of a right to health care. If the Brazilian health system is to overcome the challenges with which it is presently faced, strengthened political support is needed so that financing can be restructured and the roles of both the public and private sector can be redefined.

AB - Brazil is a country of continental dimensions with widespread regional and social inequalities. In this report, we examine the historical development and components of the Brazilian health system, focusing on the reform process during the past 40 years, including the creation of the Unified Health System. A defining characteristic of the contemporary health sector reform in Brazil is that it was driven by civil society rather than by governments, political parties, or international organisations. The advent of the Unified Health System increased access to health care for a substantial proportion of the Brazilian population, at a time when the system was becoming increasingly privatised. Much is still to be done if universal health care is to be achieved. Over the past 20 years, there have been other advances, including investments in human resources, science and technology, and primary care, and a substantial decentralisation process, widespread social participation, and growing public awareness of a right to health care. If the Brazilian health system is to overcome the challenges with which it is presently faced, strengthened political support is needed so that financing can be restructured and the roles of both the public and private sector can be redefined.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79956340491&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79956340491&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60054-8

DO - 10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60054-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 21561655

AN - SCOPUS:79956340491

VL - 377

SP - 1778

EP - 1797

JO - The Lancet

JF - The Lancet

SN - 0140-6736

IS - 9779

ER -