The baptism of early Virginia: How christianity created race

Rebecca Goetz

    Research output: Book/ReportBook

    Abstract

    In The Baptism of Early Virginia, Rebecca Anne Goetz examines the construction of race through the religious beliefs and practices of English Virginians. She argues that the seventeenth century was a critical time for the development and articulation of racial ideologies. Paramount was the idea of "hereditary heathenism," the notion that Africans and Indians were incapable of genuine Christian conversion. In Virginia in particular, English settlers initially believed that native people would quickly become Christian and would form a vibrant partnership with English people. After those hopes were dashed by vicious Anglo-Indian violence, English Virginians used Christian rituals like marriage and baptism to exclude first Indians and then Africans from the privileges enjoyed by English Christians-including freedom. Resistance to hereditary heathenism was not uncommon, however. Enslaved people and many Anglican ministers fought against planters' racial ideologies, setting the stage for Christian abolitionism in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Using court records, letters, and pamphlets, Goetz suggests new ways of approaching and understanding the deeply entwined relationship between Christianity and race in early America.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    PublisherThe Johns Hopkins University Press
    Number of pages223
    ISBN (Print)1421407000, 9781421407005
    StatePublished - 2012

    Fingerprint

    baptism
    Christianity
    Ideologies
    seventeenth century
    minister
    privilege
    religious behavior
    nineteenth century
    marriage
    violence

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Sciences(all)

    Cite this

    Goetz, R. (2012). The baptism of early Virginia: How christianity created race. The Johns Hopkins University Press.

    The baptism of early Virginia : How christianity created race. / Goetz, Rebecca.

    The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012. 223 p.

    Research output: Book/ReportBook

    Goetz, R 2012, The baptism of early Virginia: How christianity created race. The Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Goetz R. The baptism of early Virginia: How christianity created race. The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012. 223 p.
    Goetz, Rebecca. / The baptism of early Virginia : How christianity created race. The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012. 223 p.
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