The association between infants' self-regulatory behavior and MAOA gene polymorphism

Minghao Zhang, Xinyin Chen, Niobe Way, Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Huihua Deng, Xiaoyan Ke, Weiwei Yu, Ping Chen, Chuan He, Xia Chi, Zuhong Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Self-regulatory behavior in early childhood is an important characteristic that has considerable implications for the development of adaptive and maladaptive functioning. The present study investigated the relations between a functional polymorphism in the upstream region of monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) and self-regulatory behavior in a sample of Chinese infants at 6months of age. Self-regulation was assessed by observing infants' behavior of orienting visual attention away from a threatening event in the laboratory situation. The results indicated that regulatory behavior was associated with the functional MAOA gene polymorphism in girls, but not boys. Girls with 4/4 genotypes displayed significantly higher regulation than girls with 3/3 and 3/4 genotypes. The present study provided evidence for gender differences on the role of MAOA gene polymorphism in socioemotional functioning in the early years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1059-1065
Number of pages7
JournalDevelopmental Science
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

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Monoamine Oxidase
Genes
Genotype
Infant Behavior
Regulator Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

The association between infants' self-regulatory behavior and MAOA gene polymorphism. / Zhang, Minghao; Chen, Xinyin; Way, Niobe; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Deng, Huihua; Ke, Xiaoyan; Yu, Weiwei; Chen, Ping; He, Chuan; Chi, Xia; Lu, Zuhong.

In: Developmental Science, Vol. 14, No. 5, 09.2011, p. 1059-1065.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhang, Minghao ; Chen, Xinyin ; Way, Niobe ; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu ; Deng, Huihua ; Ke, Xiaoyan ; Yu, Weiwei ; Chen, Ping ; He, Chuan ; Chi, Xia ; Lu, Zuhong. / The association between infants' self-regulatory behavior and MAOA gene polymorphism. In: Developmental Science. 2011 ; Vol. 14, No. 5. pp. 1059-1065.
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AU - Ke, Xiaoyan

AU - Yu, Weiwei

AU - Chen, Ping

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AU - Chi, Xia

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