The association between discrimination and the health of Sikh Asian Indians

Sarah B. Nadimpalli, Charles M. Cleland, M. Katherine Hutchinson, Nadia Islam, Lisa L. Barnes, Nancy Van Devanter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: We investigated the relationships between self-reported discrimination (SRD) and mental and physical health (self-reported physical health conditions and direct, physiologic measures [BMI, waistto- hip ratio, and blood pressure]) among Sikh Asian Indians (AI), a group that may be particularly discriminated against because of physical manifestations of their faith, including a tendency to wear turbans or ethnic clothing. Methods: Sikh AIs (N = 196) were recruited from Sikh gurdwaras in Queens, New York. Data were collected on SRD, social support, and self-reported health, along with multiple direct physiological measures for cardiovascular health. Results: Participants who wore turbans/scarves reported higher levels of discrimination than those who did not wear turbans/scarves. As hypothesized, multiple regression analysis supported that discrimination is significantly associated with poorer selfreported mental (B = -.53, p <.001) and physical health (B = -.16, p = .04) while controlling for socioeconomic, acculturation, and social support factors. The study did not support an association between SRD and physiologic measures (elevated BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, and blood pressure). Conclusion: Consistent with previous discrimination and health reports, this study demonstrated an inverse relationship between discrimination and health among Sikh AIs, an understudied yet high-risk minority population. Community-based efforts are also needed to reduce the occurrence or buffer the effects of discrimination experienced by Sikh AIs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-355
Number of pages5
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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Health
Social Support
Blood Pressure
Acculturation
Clothing
Waist-Hip Ratio
Hip
Mental Health
Buffers
Regression Analysis
Population

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • Health disparities
  • Health outcomes
  • Sikh Asian Indian

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Nadimpalli, S. B., Cleland, C. M., Hutchinson, M. K., Islam, N., Barnes, L. L., & Van Devanter, N. (2016). The association between discrimination and the health of Sikh Asian Indians. Health Psychology, 35(4), 351-355. https://doi.org/10.1037/hea0000268

The association between discrimination and the health of Sikh Asian Indians. / Nadimpalli, Sarah B.; Cleland, Charles M.; Hutchinson, M. Katherine; Islam, Nadia; Barnes, Lisa L.; Van Devanter, Nancy.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 35, No. 4, 01.04.2016, p. 351-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nadimpalli, SB, Cleland, CM, Hutchinson, MK, Islam, N, Barnes, LL & Van Devanter, N 2016, 'The association between discrimination and the health of Sikh Asian Indians', Health Psychology, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 351-355. https://doi.org/10.1037/hea0000268
Nadimpalli, Sarah B. ; Cleland, Charles M. ; Hutchinson, M. Katherine ; Islam, Nadia ; Barnes, Lisa L. ; Van Devanter, Nancy. / The association between discrimination and the health of Sikh Asian Indians. In: Health Psychology. 2016 ; Vol. 35, No. 4. pp. 351-355.
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