The Asian crisis and the process of financial contagion

Franklin Allen, Douglas Gale

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Economists have believed for a long time that financial systems are fragile in the sense that small shocks can cause serious disruption. Research has focused on phenomena, such as bank runs, which affect the stability of individual institutions. Only recently has there been interest in the phenomenon of contagion, in which financial distress in one institution or one sector of the financial system spreads to other institutions or sectors. The crises in South-East Asia in 1997 and Russia in 1998 have provoked speculation that financial crises have spread from one country to another. This paper reviews a number of possible hypotheses about the process of financial contagion and relates them to recent events in emerging markets.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)243-249
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Financial Regulation and Compliance
    Volume7
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 1999

    Fingerprint

    Financial system
    Financial contagion
    Asian crisis
    Emerging markets
    Disruption
    Financial crisis
    South-East Asia
    Contagion
    Russia
    Financial distress
    Bank runs
    Economists
    Speculation

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Finance
    • Strategy and Management

    Cite this

    The Asian crisis and the process of financial contagion. / Allen, Franklin; Gale, Douglas.

    In: Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, Vol. 7, No. 3, 1999, p. 243-249.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Allen, Franklin ; Gale, Douglas. / The Asian crisis and the process of financial contagion. In: Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance. 1999 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 243-249.
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