The Arab Oedipus

ancient categories, modern fiction

Philip Kennedy

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This article examines the use of anagnorisis in five Arab adaptations of Oedipus Rex from the 1940s to the early 21st century. The article traces the progressive erosion of the force of anagnorisis in four of these plays—a reflection of a modernist and postmodernist move away from certainty, as well as the specific concerns of the Arab adaptors. The fifth play, Wajdi Mouawad’s Incendies/Scorched, is described as a return to the classical structure of anagnorisis with powerful effect. While this loose adaptation of Oedipus Rex explores universal themes, it is an undoubtedly Arab work and demonstrates that the role of anagnorisis is in large part culturally dependent on who or what we recognize.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)64-77
    Number of pages14
    JournalMiddle Eastern Literatures
    Volume20
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 2 2017

    Fingerprint

    Oedipus
    Fiction
    Certainty
    Modernist
    Postmodernist
    1940s
    Erosion
    21st Century

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Literature and Literary Theory

    Cite this

    The Arab Oedipus : ancient categories, modern fiction. / Kennedy, Philip.

    In: Middle Eastern Literatures, Vol. 20, No. 1, 02.01.2017, p. 64-77.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Kennedy, Philip. / The Arab Oedipus : ancient categories, modern fiction. In: Middle Eastern Literatures. 2017 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 64-77.
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