Testing for HSV-2 infection among pregnant teens

Implications for clinical practice

Richard A. Crosby, Ralph DiClemente, Gina M. Wingood, Eve Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To pilot test the feasibility of screening pregnant teens for HSV-2 infection during their first prenatal visit. Study Design: A cross-sectional study of 127 African-American adolescent females recruited during their first attendance to a prenatal clinic in a large urban hospital. A rapid serologic test (POCkit, manufactured by Diagnology Inc.) was used to assess HSV-2. The test uses a membrane-based immunoassay to detect circulating IgG antibodies to a specific antigen obtained from HSV-2 (semi-purified glycoprotein G2). Results: More than one-fifth (21.3%) of the adolescents tested positive for HSV-2; only 1 adolescent was previously aware of her infection. Older adolescents and those reporting a history of other STDs were significantly more likely to test positive for HSV-2. Conclusions: Testing for HSV-2 in early pregnancy may be an efficient strategy for (1) initiating patient education designed to promote adoption of protective behaviors among adolescents at risk of HSV-2 acquisition during the remainder of their pregnancy and (2) teaching those who test positive how to recognize symptoms of HSV-2 outbreaks; patients reporting recurrent outbreaks during pregnancy may benefit from predelivery assessment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-41
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003

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Human Herpesvirus 2
Infection
Pregnancy
Disease Outbreaks
Adolescent Behavior
Urban Hospitals
Serologic Tests
Patient Education
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Immunoassay
African Americans
Glycoproteins
Teaching
Cross-Sectional Studies
Immunoglobulin G
Antigens
Membranes
Antibodies

Keywords

  • African-American, adolescents
  • Herpes
  • Pregnancy
  • STDs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Testing for HSV-2 infection among pregnant teens : Implications for clinical practice. / Crosby, Richard A.; DiClemente, Ralph; Wingood, Gina M.; Rose, Eve.

In: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.02.2003, p. 39-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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