Testing and treatment behaviour of HIV-infected women: White, African-American, Puerto Rican comparisons

K. Siegel, D. Karus, Victoria Raveis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Findings from a study of the testing and treatment behaviour and experiences of African-American (n = 31), Puerto Rican (n = 30) and non-Hispanic white (n = 23) HIV-infected women are reported. All women were 20-45 years of age and had not yet been diagnosed with AIDS. Data for the analyses presented were gathered through an interviewer-administered questionnaire completed before respondents participated in an unstructured interview. The analyses examine race/ethnic differences in women's delays in seeking testing and medical care, and in sources and types of HIV-treatment. Most significant for primary and secondary prevention efforts, the findings suggest that a significant proportion of women who suspect they are infected may delay being tested, and further, a substantial proportion who learn they are seropositive may delay seeking medical care. Thus important opportunities among HIV-infected women for secondary prevention through timely antiviral and prophylactic treatment, and for primary prevention through risk-reduction counselling may be being missed in many cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-309
Number of pages13
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume9
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jul 24 1997

Fingerprint

African Americans
HIV
medical care
Primary Prevention
Secondary Prevention
Interviews
Therapeutics
interview
counseling
Risk Reduction Behavior
AIDS
Antiviral Agents
Counseling
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
American
questionnaire
experience
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

@article{830a3ca7bd7247efbf6a34f4ba7c5d01,
title = "Testing and treatment behaviour of HIV-infected women: White, African-American, Puerto Rican comparisons",
abstract = "Findings from a study of the testing and treatment behaviour and experiences of African-American (n = 31), Puerto Rican (n = 30) and non-Hispanic white (n = 23) HIV-infected women are reported. All women were 20-45 years of age and had not yet been diagnosed with AIDS. Data for the analyses presented were gathered through an interviewer-administered questionnaire completed before respondents participated in an unstructured interview. The analyses examine race/ethnic differences in women's delays in seeking testing and medical care, and in sources and types of HIV-treatment. Most significant for primary and secondary prevention efforts, the findings suggest that a significant proportion of women who suspect they are infected may delay being tested, and further, a substantial proportion who learn they are seropositive may delay seeking medical care. Thus important opportunities among HIV-infected women for secondary prevention through timely antiviral and prophylactic treatment, and for primary prevention through risk-reduction counselling may be being missed in many cases.",
author = "K. Siegel and D. Karus and Victoria Raveis",
year = "1997",
month = "7",
day = "24",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "297--309",
journal = "AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV",
issn = "0954-0121",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Testing and treatment behaviour of HIV-infected women

T2 - White, African-American, Puerto Rican comparisons

AU - Siegel, K.

AU - Karus, D.

AU - Raveis, Victoria

PY - 1997/7/24

Y1 - 1997/7/24

N2 - Findings from a study of the testing and treatment behaviour and experiences of African-American (n = 31), Puerto Rican (n = 30) and non-Hispanic white (n = 23) HIV-infected women are reported. All women were 20-45 years of age and had not yet been diagnosed with AIDS. Data for the analyses presented were gathered through an interviewer-administered questionnaire completed before respondents participated in an unstructured interview. The analyses examine race/ethnic differences in women's delays in seeking testing and medical care, and in sources and types of HIV-treatment. Most significant for primary and secondary prevention efforts, the findings suggest that a significant proportion of women who suspect they are infected may delay being tested, and further, a substantial proportion who learn they are seropositive may delay seeking medical care. Thus important opportunities among HIV-infected women for secondary prevention through timely antiviral and prophylactic treatment, and for primary prevention through risk-reduction counselling may be being missed in many cases.

AB - Findings from a study of the testing and treatment behaviour and experiences of African-American (n = 31), Puerto Rican (n = 30) and non-Hispanic white (n = 23) HIV-infected women are reported. All women were 20-45 years of age and had not yet been diagnosed with AIDS. Data for the analyses presented were gathered through an interviewer-administered questionnaire completed before respondents participated in an unstructured interview. The analyses examine race/ethnic differences in women's delays in seeking testing and medical care, and in sources and types of HIV-treatment. Most significant for primary and secondary prevention efforts, the findings suggest that a significant proportion of women who suspect they are infected may delay being tested, and further, a substantial proportion who learn they are seropositive may delay seeking medical care. Thus important opportunities among HIV-infected women for secondary prevention through timely antiviral and prophylactic treatment, and for primary prevention through risk-reduction counselling may be being missed in many cases.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030760351&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030760351&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 297

EP - 309

JO - AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV

JF - AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV

SN - 0954-0121

IS - 3

ER -