Telecommuting and the demand for urban living

A preliminary look at white-collar workers

Ingrid Gould Ellen, Katherine Hempstead

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

With recent advances in communications technology, telecommuting appears to be an increasingly viable option for many workers. For urban researchers, the key question is whether this growing ability to telecommute is altering residential location decisions and leading households to live in smaller, lower-density and more remote locations. Using the Work Schedules supplement from the 1997 Current Population Study, this paper explores this question. Specifically, it examines the prevalence of telecommuting, explores the relationship between telecommuting and the residential choices of white-collar workers and, finally, speculates about future impacts on residential patterns and urban form.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)749-766
Number of pages18
JournalUrban Studies
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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telecommuting
worker
demand
location decision
residential location
supplement
communication technology
communication
ability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Telecommuting and the demand for urban living : A preliminary look at white-collar workers. / Ellen, Ingrid Gould; Hempstead, Katherine.

In: Urban Studies, Vol. 39, No. 4, 2002, p. 749-766.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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