Teaching through interactions: Testing a developmental framework of teacher effectiveness in over 4,000 classrooms

Bridget K. Hamre, Robert C. Pianta, Jason T. Downer, Jamie DeCoster, Andrew J. Mashburn, Stephanie M. Jones, Joshua L. Brown, Elise Cappella, Marc Atkins, Susan E. Rivers, Marc A. Brackett, Aki Hamagami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Validating frameworks for understanding classroom processes that contribute to student learning and development is important to advance the scientific study of teaching. This article presents one such framework, Teaching through Interactions, which posits that teacher-student interactions are a central driver for student learning and organizes teacher-student interactions into three major domains. Results provide evidence that across 4,341 preschool to elementary classrooms (1) teacher-student classroom interactions comprise distinct emotional, organizational, and instructional domains; (2) the three-domain latent structure is a better fit to observational data than alternative one- and two-domain models of teacherstudent classroom interactions; and (3) the three-domain structure is the best-fitting model across multiple data sets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-487
Number of pages27
JournalElementary School Journal
Volume113
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

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classroom
student teacher
Teaching
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learning
student
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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Hamre, B. K., Pianta, R. C., Downer, J. T., DeCoster, J., Mashburn, A. J., Jones, S. M., ... Hamagami, A. (2013). Teaching through interactions: Testing a developmental framework of teacher effectiveness in over 4,000 classrooms. Elementary School Journal, 113(4), 461-487. https://doi.org/10.1086/669616

Teaching through interactions : Testing a developmental framework of teacher effectiveness in over 4,000 classrooms. / Hamre, Bridget K.; Pianta, Robert C.; Downer, Jason T.; DeCoster, Jamie; Mashburn, Andrew J.; Jones, Stephanie M.; Brown, Joshua L.; Cappella, Elise; Atkins, Marc; Rivers, Susan E.; Brackett, Marc A.; Hamagami, Aki.

In: Elementary School Journal, Vol. 113, No. 4, 06.2013, p. 461-487.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hamre, BK, Pianta, RC, Downer, JT, DeCoster, J, Mashburn, AJ, Jones, SM, Brown, JL, Cappella, E, Atkins, M, Rivers, SE, Brackett, MA & Hamagami, A 2013, 'Teaching through interactions: Testing a developmental framework of teacher effectiveness in over 4,000 classrooms', Elementary School Journal, vol. 113, no. 4, pp. 461-487. https://doi.org/10.1086/669616
Hamre, Bridget K. ; Pianta, Robert C. ; Downer, Jason T. ; DeCoster, Jamie ; Mashburn, Andrew J. ; Jones, Stephanie M. ; Brown, Joshua L. ; Cappella, Elise ; Atkins, Marc ; Rivers, Susan E. ; Brackett, Marc A. ; Hamagami, Aki. / Teaching through interactions : Testing a developmental framework of teacher effectiveness in over 4,000 classrooms. In: Elementary School Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 113, No. 4. pp. 461-487.
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