Targeting STD/HIV prevention interventions for heterosexual male adolescents in North and Central America

A review

Mbeja Lomotey, Jennifer L. Brown, Ralph DiClemente

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Background: Adolescents experience elevated rates of STDs and HIV. STD/HIV prevention interventions for young men are crucial to decrease their STD/HIV rates and reduce disease transmission to female partners. To advance sexual health promotion interventions for young men, this paper reviewed the efficacy of STD/HIV prevention interventions conducted in North and Central America in the past 20 years. Method: PubMed, Google Scholar, and EBSCO Host databases were used to locate STD/HIV interventions. Eligible interventions were limited to STD/HIV interventions for young men between the ages of 10 and 18. We review 8 STD/HIV prevention interventions targeting heterosexual adolescent males and summarize key intervention components and content, overview intervention efficacy outcome data, and provide directions for future research. Results: The majority of interventions were guided by health behavior change theory. Interventions employed interactive group-based education and behavioral skills training to reduce risky sexual behaviors. All interventions used a randomized controlled trial design with a comparison or control group. Follow-up times varied markedly, ranging from 3 weeks to 36 months. All but one intervention improved at least one behavioral outcome (e.g., increased frequency of condom use). Conclusions: Findings suggest that male adolescent interventions can effectively curtail the STD/HIV epidemic. Major weaknesses of the reviewed studies include the reliance on self-report behavioral measures, lack of biological endpoints, and short follow-ups. Study strengths include use of randomized control trial design and theory-based content. Future research should increase the dissemination of effective sexual risk reduction interventions to decrease STD/HIV among adolescent males and their female partners.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)376-382
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Pediatric Reviews
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Central America
Heterosexuality
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
North America
HIV
Reproductive Health
Health Behavior
Condoms
Risk Reduction Behavior
Health Promotion
PubMed
Sexual Behavior
Self Report
Randomized Controlled Trials
Databases
Education
Control Groups

Keywords

  • African-American adolescent males
  • HIV
  • Review
  • STD
  • STD/HIV prevention interventions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Targeting STD/HIV prevention interventions for heterosexual male adolescents in North and Central America : A review. / Lomotey, Mbeja; Brown, Jennifer L.; DiClemente, Ralph.

In: Current Pediatric Reviews, Vol. 9, No. 4, 01.01.2013, p. 376-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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