Talking text and talking back: "my BFF jill" from boob tube to youtube

Graham M. Jones, Bambi Schieffelin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This article analyzes both a series of 2007-8 U.S. TV ads that humorously deploy the language of text messaging, and the subsequent debates about the linguistic status of texting. We explore the ambivalence of commercials that at once resonate with fears of messaging slang as a verbal contagion and luxuriate in the playful inversion of standard language hierarchies. The commercials were invoked by monologic mainstream media as evidence of language decay, but their circulation on YouTube invited dialogic metalinguistic discussions, young people and texting proponents sharing the floor with adults and language prescriptivists. We examine some of the themes that emerge in the commentary YouTubers have posted about these ads, and discuss the style of that commentary as itself significant.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1050-1079
    Number of pages30
    JournalJournal of Computer-Mediated Communication
    Volume14
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 2009

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    Text messaging
    Linguistics

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Computer Networks and Communications
    • Computer Science Applications

    Cite this

    Talking text and talking back : "my BFF jill" from boob tube to youtube. / Jones, Graham M.; Schieffelin, Bambi.

    In: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, Vol. 14, No. 4, 07.2009, p. 1050-1079.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Jones, Graham M. ; Schieffelin, Bambi. / Talking text and talking back : "my BFF jill" from boob tube to youtube. In: Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication. 2009 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 1050-1079.
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