Talking city trouble

Interactional vandalism, social inequality, and the "Urban interaction problem"

Mitchell Duneier, Harvey Molotch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article uses ethnography and conversation analysis to pinpoint what "goes wrong" when certain so-called street people "harass" passersby. The technical properties of sidewalk encounters between particular black street men and middle-class white female residents of Greenwich Village are compared with interactions expected from studies of other conversation situations. The men attempt to initiate conversations and to deal with efforts to close them in ways that betray the practical ethics fundamental to all social interaction. In this way they undermine the requisites not just for "urbanism as a way of life," but the bases for how sociability generally proceeds. These acts of "interactional vandalism" both reflect and contribute to the larger structural conditions shaping the local scene.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1263-1295
Number of pages33
JournalAmerican Journal of Sociology
Volume104
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 1999

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vandalism
social inequality
conversation
conversation analysis
sociability
way of life
interaction
ethnography
middle class
village
moral philosophy
resident

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Talking city trouble : Interactional vandalism, social inequality, and the "Urban interaction problem". / Duneier, Mitchell; Molotch, Harvey.

In: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 104, No. 5, 03.1999, p. 1263-1295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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