Synaptic plasticity and translation initiation

Eric Klann, Marcia D. Antion, Jessica L. Banko, Lingfei Hou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It is widely accepted that protein synthesis, including local protein synthesis at synapses, is required for several forms of synaptic plasticity. Local protein synthesis enables synapses to control synaptic strength independent of the cell body via rapid protein production from pre-existing mRNA. Therefore, regulation of translation initiation is likely to be intimately involved in modulating synaptic strength. Our understanding of the translation-initiation process has expanded greatly in recent years. In this review, we discuss various aspects of translation initiation, as well as signaling pathways that might be involved in coupling neurotransmitter and neurotrophin receptors to the translation machinery during various forms of synaptic plasticity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-372
Number of pages8
JournalLearning and Memory
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004

Fingerprint

Neuronal Plasticity
Synapses
Proteins
Nerve Growth Factor Receptors
Neurotransmitter Receptor
RNA Precursors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Synaptic plasticity and translation initiation. / Klann, Eric; Antion, Marcia D.; Banko, Jessica L.; Hou, Lingfei.

In: Learning and Memory, Vol. 11, No. 4, 07.2004, p. 365-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klann, E, Antion, MD, Banko, JL & Hou, L 2004, 'Synaptic plasticity and translation initiation', Learning and Memory, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 365-372. https://doi.org/10.1101/lm.79004
Klann, Eric ; Antion, Marcia D. ; Banko, Jessica L. ; Hou, Lingfei. / Synaptic plasticity and translation initiation. In: Learning and Memory. 2004 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 365-372.
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