Survey research and the silent majority.

J. B. Doron, S. M. Hirsch, Gary Goldstein, P. Asen, M. E. Gallagher, T. M. O'Mahony

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A survey conducted at the New York University Dental Center demonstrated that significant differences exist between patients who are ready participants in research efforts and those who require the more persistent attention of the researcher. In addition, patients who were questioned while in treatment emphasized different reasons for selecting a dental school for treatment than did those patients who were interviewed prior to beginning treatment. The importance of collecting data from a truly random sample of patients is stressed and elaborated with reference to the marketing implications of the results. Strategies for patient recruitment and retention require knowledge that is complete and does not suffer from systematic absences in the data base. Careful data collection methods are described and advocated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)671-676
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Dental Education
Volume43
Issue number13
StatePublished - Dec 1979

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survey research
data collection method
Research
random sample
marketing
Dental Schools
Marketing
school
Patient Selection
Tooth
Therapeutics
Research Personnel
Databases
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Doron, J. B., Hirsch, S. M., Goldstein, G., Asen, P., Gallagher, M. E., & O'Mahony, T. M. (1979). Survey research and the silent majority. Journal of Dental Education, 43(13), 671-676.

Survey research and the silent majority. / Doron, J. B.; Hirsch, S. M.; Goldstein, Gary; Asen, P.; Gallagher, M. E.; O'Mahony, T. M.

In: Journal of Dental Education, Vol. 43, No. 13, 12.1979, p. 671-676.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Doron, JB, Hirsch, SM, Goldstein, G, Asen, P, Gallagher, ME & O'Mahony, TM 1979, 'Survey research and the silent majority.', Journal of Dental Education, vol. 43, no. 13, pp. 671-676.
Doron JB, Hirsch SM, Goldstein G, Asen P, Gallagher ME, O'Mahony TM. Survey research and the silent majority. Journal of Dental Education. 1979 Dec;43(13):671-676.
Doron, J. B. ; Hirsch, S. M. ; Goldstein, Gary ; Asen, P. ; Gallagher, M. E. ; O'Mahony, T. M. / Survey research and the silent majority. In: Journal of Dental Education. 1979 ; Vol. 43, No. 13. pp. 671-676.
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