Surface absorption of monolayers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) offer unique opportunities to increase fundamental understanding of self-organization, structure-property relationships, and interfacial phenomena. They are excellent model systems that provide needed design flexibility, both at the individual molecular and material levels. However, for SAMs to be technologically important, one needs to understand not only the relationship between the structure of the individual molecule and the structure of the assembly it forms, but also the relationship between a given microscopic molecular property and its manifestation in the appropriate macroscopic property, arising from a spatial and thermal average of the microscopic property over the assembly structure. Such understanding is the prerequisite to any progress in the development of new materials using the molecular design approach and self-assembly. Moreover, understanding the mutual relationships between chemisorption symmetry, intermolecular interactions, ω-functional groups, and monolayer structure in SAMs is important not only for designing a new material, but also for the engineering of surfaces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-51
Number of pages6
JournalMRS Bulletin
Volume20
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1995

Fingerprint

Self assembled monolayers
Monolayers
assembly
Chemisorption
Self assembly
Functional groups
molecular properties
chemisorption
self assembly
flexibility
Molecules
engineering
symmetry
molecules
interactions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Surface absorption of monolayers. / Ulman, Abraham.

In: MRS Bulletin, Vol. 20, No. 6, 06.1995, p. 46-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ulman, A 1995, 'Surface absorption of monolayers', MRS Bulletin, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 46-51.
Ulman, Abraham. / Surface absorption of monolayers. In: MRS Bulletin. 1995 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 46-51.
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