Supporting Visual and Verbal Learning Preferences in a Second-Language Multimedia Learning Environment

Jan Plass, Dorothy M. Chun, Richard E. Mayer, Detlev Leutner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

English-speaking college students who were enrolled in a German course read a 762-word German language story presented by a computer program. For key words in the story, students could choose to see a translation on the screen in English (i.e., verbal annotation) or view a picture or video clip representing the word (i.e., visual annotation), or both. Students remembered word translations better when they had selected both visual and verbal annotations during learning than only 1 or no annotation; students comprehended the story better when they had the opportunity to receive their preferred mode of annotation. Results are consistent with a generative theory of multimedia learning that assumes that learners actively select relevant verbal and visual information, organize the information into coherent mental representations, and integrate these newly constructed visual and verbal representations with one another.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-36
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume90
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1998

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Verbal Learning
Multimedia
multimedia
learning environment
Language
Learning
Students
language
learning
student
video clip
German language
data processing program
Surgical Instruments
speaking
Software

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Supporting Visual and Verbal Learning Preferences in a Second-Language Multimedia Learning Environment. / Plass, Jan; Chun, Dorothy M.; Mayer, Richard E.; Leutner, Detlev.

In: Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol. 90, No. 1, 03.1998, p. 25-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Plass, Jan ; Chun, Dorothy M. ; Mayer, Richard E. ; Leutner, Detlev. / Supporting Visual and Verbal Learning Preferences in a Second-Language Multimedia Learning Environment. In: Journal of Educational Psychology. 1998 ; Vol. 90, No. 1. pp. 25-36.
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