Supersize my identity

When thoughts of contracting swine flu boost one's patriotic identity

Jocelyn Belanger, Tim Faber, Michele J. Gelfand

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Pandemics are socially threatening situations that rapidly spread across large regions. Thinking of contracting dangerous diseases can potentially evoke fear and death-related thoughts. The aim of the present work was to investigate how individuals respond to fear associated with contracting a pandemic disease (i.e., swine flu). In accordance with the mortality salience hypothesis of terror management theory (Greenberg, Pyszczynski, & Solomon, 1986), we predicted that individuals concerned with contracting swine flu would demonstrate greater investment in cultural worldviews (i.e., patriotism) in response to death anxiety. The implications of these findings for understanding global issues in domains related to health and politics are discussed.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
    Volume43
    Issue numberSUPPL.1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

    Fingerprint

    Pandemics
    Fear
    Swine
    Swine Diseases
    Politics
    Anxiety
    Mortality
    Health
    Thinking

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Psychology

    Cite this

    Supersize my identity : When thoughts of contracting swine flu boost one's patriotic identity. / Belanger, Jocelyn; Faber, Tim; Gelfand, Michele J.

    In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Vol. 43, No. SUPPL.1, 01.06.2013.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Belanger, Jocelyn ; Faber, Tim ; Gelfand, Michele J. / Supersize my identity : When thoughts of contracting swine flu boost one's patriotic identity. In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 43, No. SUPPL.1.
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