Sulphur-rich volcanic eruptions and stratospheric aerosols

Michael Rampino, Stephen Self

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During the past decade it has become clear that the long-lived stratospheric clouds produced by volcanic eruptions are composed largely of sulphuric acid aerosols1,2. The amount of sulphur-rich volatiles (for example, SO2, H2S) injected into the stratosphere by an explosive eruption is, therefore, a critical determinant of its atmospheric impact3,4. The small-volume eruptions of Mt Agung in 1963 and El Chichón in 1982 both generated substantial stratospheric aerosol clouds, despite the fact that they erupted ≲0.5 km3 of magma. Comparison of data from direct measurements of stratospheric optical depth, Greenland ice-core acidity, and volcanological studies shows that such relatively small, but sulphur-rich, eruptions can have atmospheric effects equal to or even greater than much larger sulphur-poor eruptions. These small eruptions are probably the most frequent cause of increased stratospheric aerosols.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)677-679
Number of pages3
JournalNature
Volume310
Issue number5979
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984

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volcanic eruption
sulfur
aerosol
volcanic cloud
ice core
sulfuric acid
optical depth
stratosphere
explosive
acidity
magma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

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Sulphur-rich volcanic eruptions and stratospheric aerosols. / Rampino, Michael; Self, Stephen.

In: Nature, Vol. 310, No. 5979, 1984, p. 677-679.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rampino, Michael ; Self, Stephen. / Sulphur-rich volcanic eruptions and stratospheric aerosols. In: Nature. 1984 ; Vol. 310, No. 5979. pp. 677-679.
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