Success and failure suppressing reflexive behavior

Clayton Curtis, Mark D'Esposito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The dynamic interplay between reflexive and controlled determinants of behavior is one of the most general organizing principles of brain function. A powerful analogue of this interplay is seen in the antisaccade task, which pits reflexive and willed saccadic mechanisms against one another. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain showed greater prestimulus preparatory activity in the pre-supplementary motor area before voluntary antisaccades (saccades away from a target) compared with reflexive prosaccades (saccades to a target). Moreover, this preparatory activity was critically associated with reflex suppression; it predicted whether the reflex was later successfully inhibited in the trial. These data illustrate a mechanism for top-down control over reflexive behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-418
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2003

Fingerprint

Saccades
Reflex
Motor Cortex
Brain
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Success and failure suppressing reflexive behavior. / Curtis, Clayton; D'Esposito, Mark.

In: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.04.2003, p. 409-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Curtis, Clayton ; D'Esposito, Mark. / Success and failure suppressing reflexive behavior. In: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 2003 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 409-418.
@article{fe30c0bee9824347ac98e9ba40249e31,
title = "Success and failure suppressing reflexive behavior",
abstract = "The dynamic interplay between reflexive and controlled determinants of behavior is one of the most general organizing principles of brain function. A powerful analogue of this interplay is seen in the antisaccade task, which pits reflexive and willed saccadic mechanisms against one another. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain showed greater prestimulus preparatory activity in the pre-supplementary motor area before voluntary antisaccades (saccades away from a target) compared with reflexive prosaccades (saccades to a target). Moreover, this preparatory activity was critically associated with reflex suppression; it predicted whether the reflex was later successfully inhibited in the trial. These data illustrate a mechanism for top-down control over reflexive behavior.",
author = "Clayton Curtis and Mark D'Esposito",
year = "2003",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1162/089892903321593126",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "409--418",
journal = "Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience",
issn = "0898-929X",
publisher = "MIT Press Journals",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Success and failure suppressing reflexive behavior

AU - Curtis, Clayton

AU - D'Esposito, Mark

PY - 2003/4/1

Y1 - 2003/4/1

N2 - The dynamic interplay between reflexive and controlled determinants of behavior is one of the most general organizing principles of brain function. A powerful analogue of this interplay is seen in the antisaccade task, which pits reflexive and willed saccadic mechanisms against one another. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain showed greater prestimulus preparatory activity in the pre-supplementary motor area before voluntary antisaccades (saccades away from a target) compared with reflexive prosaccades (saccades to a target). Moreover, this preparatory activity was critically associated with reflex suppression; it predicted whether the reflex was later successfully inhibited in the trial. These data illustrate a mechanism for top-down control over reflexive behavior.

AB - The dynamic interplay between reflexive and controlled determinants of behavior is one of the most general organizing principles of brain function. A powerful analogue of this interplay is seen in the antisaccade task, which pits reflexive and willed saccadic mechanisms against one another. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain showed greater prestimulus preparatory activity in the pre-supplementary motor area before voluntary antisaccades (saccades away from a target) compared with reflexive prosaccades (saccades to a target). Moreover, this preparatory activity was critically associated with reflex suppression; it predicted whether the reflex was later successfully inhibited in the trial. These data illustrate a mechanism for top-down control over reflexive behavior.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037391164&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037391164&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1162/089892903321593126

DO - 10.1162/089892903321593126

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 409

EP - 418

JO - Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

JF - Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

SN - 0898-929X

IS - 3

ER -