Subtle Linguistic Cues Increase Girls’ Engagement in Science

Marjorie Rhodes, Sarah Jane Leslie, Kathryn M. Yee, Katya Saunders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The roots of gender disparities in science achievement take hold in early childhood. The present studies aimed to identify a modifiable feature of young children’s environments that could be targeted to reduce gender differences in science behavior among young children. Four experimental studies with children (N = 501) revealed that describing science in terms of actions (“Let’s do science! Doing science means exploring the world!”) instead of identities (“Let’s be scientists! Scientists explore the world!”) increased girls’ subsequent persistence in new science games designed to illustrate the scientific method. These studies thus identified subtle but powerful linguistic cues that could be targeted to help reduce gender disparities in science engagement in early childhood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychological Science
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Linguistics
Cues

Keywords

  • cognitive development
  • language
  • open data
  • open materials
  • science education
  • sex
  • social cognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Subtle Linguistic Cues Increase Girls’ Engagement in Science. / Rhodes, Marjorie; Leslie, Sarah Jane; Yee, Kathryn M.; Saunders, Katya.

In: Psychological Science, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rhodes, Marjorie ; Leslie, Sarah Jane ; Yee, Kathryn M. ; Saunders, Katya. / Subtle Linguistic Cues Increase Girls’ Engagement in Science. In: Psychological Science. 2019.
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