Substance use treatment barriers for patients with frequent hospital admissions

Maria C. Raven, Emily R. Carrier, Joshua Lee, John Billings, Mollie Marr, Marc Gourevitch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Substance use (SU) disorders adversely impact health status and contribute to inappropriate health services use. This qualitative study sought to determine SU-related factors contributing to repeated hospitalizations and to identify opportunities for preventive interventions. Fifty Medicaid-insured inpatients identified by a validated statistical algorithm as being at high-risk for frequent hospitalizations were interviewed at an urban public hospital. Patient drug/alcohol history, experiences with medical, psychiatric and addiction treatment, and social factors contributing to readmission were evaluated. Three themes related to SU and frequent hospitalizations emerged: (a) barriers during hospitalization to planning long-term treatment and follow-up, (b) use of the hospital as a temporary solution to housing/family problems, and (c) unsuccessful SU aftercare following discharge. These data indicate that homelessness, brief lengths of stay complicating discharge planning, patient ambivalence regarding long-term treatment, and inadequate detox-to-rehab transfer resources compromise substance-using patients' likelihood of avoiding repeat hospitalization. Intervention targets included supportive housing, detox-to-rehab transportation, and postdischarge patient support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-30
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Substance Abuse Treatment
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

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Hospitalization
Transportation of Patients
Therapeutics
Homeless Persons
Aftercare
Patient Discharge
Public Hospitals
Urban Hospitals
Medicaid
Health Status
Health Services
Substance-Related Disorders
Psychiatry
Inpatients
Length of Stay
History
Alcohols
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Frequent hospitalization
  • High risk
  • Homelessness
  • Medicaid
  • Substance use
  • Treatment barriers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Phychiatric Mental Health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Substance use treatment barriers for patients with frequent hospital admissions. / Raven, Maria C.; Carrier, Emily R.; Lee, Joshua; Billings, John; Marr, Mollie; Gourevitch, Marc.

In: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.2010, p. 22-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raven, Maria C. ; Carrier, Emily R. ; Lee, Joshua ; Billings, John ; Marr, Mollie ; Gourevitch, Marc. / Substance use treatment barriers for patients with frequent hospital admissions. In: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. 2010 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 22-30.
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