Submandibular salivary proteases

Lack of a role in anti-HIV activity

S. Kennedy, C. Davis, W. R. Abrams, P. C. Billings, T. Nagashunmugam, H. Friedman, Daniel Malamud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Whole human saliva contains a number of proteolytic enzymes, mostly derived from white blood cells and bacteria in the oral cavity. However, less information is available regarding proteases produced by salivary glands and present in salivary secretions. In the present study, We have analyzed submandibular saliva, collected Without contaminating cells, and identified multiple proteolytic activities. These have been characterized in terms of their susceptibility to a Series of protease inhibitors. The submandibular saliva proteases were shown to be sensitive to both serine and acidic protease inhibitors. We also used protease inhibitors to determine if salivary proteolytic activity was involved in the inhibition of HIV infectivity seen when the virus is incubated with human saliva. This anti-HIV activity has been reported to occur in whole saliva and in ductal saliva obtained from both the parotid and submandibular glands, with highest levels of activity present in the latter fluid. Protease inhibitors, at concentrations sufficient to block salivary proteolytic activity in an in vitro infectivity assay, did not block the anti-HIV effects of saliva, suggesting that the salivary proteases are not responsible for the inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1515-1519
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Dental Research
Volume77
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Saliva
Peptide Hydrolases
HIV
Protease Inhibitors
Serine Proteinase Inhibitors
Submandibular Gland
Parotid Gland
Salivary Glands
Mouth
HIV-1
Leukocytes
Viruses
Bacteria

Keywords

  • HIV-1
  • Proteases
  • Saliva

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Kennedy, S., Davis, C., Abrams, W. R., Billings, P. C., Nagashunmugam, T., Friedman, H., & Malamud, D. (1998). Submandibular salivary proteases: Lack of a role in anti-HIV activity. Journal of Dental Research, 77(7), 1515-1519.

Submandibular salivary proteases : Lack of a role in anti-HIV activity. / Kennedy, S.; Davis, C.; Abrams, W. R.; Billings, P. C.; Nagashunmugam, T.; Friedman, H.; Malamud, Daniel.

In: Journal of Dental Research, Vol. 77, No. 7, 1998, p. 1515-1519.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kennedy, S, Davis, C, Abrams, WR, Billings, PC, Nagashunmugam, T, Friedman, H & Malamud, D 1998, 'Submandibular salivary proteases: Lack of a role in anti-HIV activity', Journal of Dental Research, vol. 77, no. 7, pp. 1515-1519.
Kennedy S, Davis C, Abrams WR, Billings PC, Nagashunmugam T, Friedman H et al. Submandibular salivary proteases: Lack of a role in anti-HIV activity. Journal of Dental Research. 1998;77(7):1515-1519.
Kennedy, S. ; Davis, C. ; Abrams, W. R. ; Billings, P. C. ; Nagashunmugam, T. ; Friedman, H. ; Malamud, Daniel. / Submandibular salivary proteases : Lack of a role in anti-HIV activity. In: Journal of Dental Research. 1998 ; Vol. 77, No. 7. pp. 1515-1519.
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