Student and instructor perceptions of writing tasks and performance on TOEFL iBT versus university writing courses

Lorena Llosa, Margaret E. Malone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined student and instructor perceptions of writing tasks and performance on TOEFL iBT versus university writing courses. Participants included 103 international, nonnative-English-speaking undergraduate students enrolled in required university writing courses and their writing instructors (n = 18). Students completed a background questionnaire, two TOEFL iBT writing tasks (one Integrated and one Independent), and a questionnaire about their perceptions of the writing tasks. The 18 instructors also completed a questionnaire and sx participated in an extended interview. Students and instructors reported that neither the Independent nor the Integrated task alone was representative of the types of writing they do in their writing course. However, the Independent and Integrated task together represented many of the characteristics of course assignments. Additionally, instructors perceived the criteria in the TOEFL iBT writing rubrics to be very similar to the criteria that they use in class to assess student writing suggesting that TOEFL iBT tasks and course assignments are based on a similar operationalization of the writing construct. Finally, students and instructors generally perceived the quality of the writing produced for the TOEFL iBT writing tasks to be comparable to the quality of writing produced in course assignments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-99
Number of pages12
JournalAssessing Writing
Volume34
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017

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Keywords

  • Extrapolation inference
  • Integrated task
  • TOEFL iBT
  • Validity
  • Writing assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language

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