Stress and the development of executive functions

Experiential canalization of brain and behavior

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

A psychobiological model of self-regulation development in early childhood is described and empirical support for the model is presented. The model outlines hierarchical relations among influences on self-regulation development ranging from the genetic to social-cultural levels. The role of experience in the shaping or canalization of relations among levels of influence is examined and analyses of data from the Family Life Project, a longitudinal population-based sample of children and families followed from birth is shown to provide support for the model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMinnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series
PublisherJohn Wiley and Sons Ltd.
Pages145-180
Number of pages36
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Publication series

NameMinnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series
Volume37
ISSN (Print)0076-9266

Fingerprint

Executive Function
Brain
Parturition
Population
Self-Control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Blair, C. (2011). Stress and the development of executive functions: Experiential canalization of brain and behavior. In Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series (pp. 145-180). (Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series; Vol. 37). John Wiley and Sons Ltd.. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118732373.ch5

Stress and the development of executive functions : Experiential canalization of brain and behavior. / Blair, Clancy.

Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series. John Wiley and Sons Ltd., 2011. p. 145-180 (Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series; Vol. 37).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Blair, C 2011, Stress and the development of executive functions: Experiential canalization of brain and behavior. in Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series. Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series, vol. 37, John Wiley and Sons Ltd., pp. 145-180. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118732373.ch5
Blair C. Stress and the development of executive functions: Experiential canalization of brain and behavior. In Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series. John Wiley and Sons Ltd. 2011. p. 145-180. (Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series). https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118732373.ch5
Blair, Clancy. / Stress and the development of executive functions : Experiential canalization of brain and behavior. Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series. John Wiley and Sons Ltd., 2011. pp. 145-180 (Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology Series).
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