Stigma and restriction on the social life of families of children with intellectual disabilities in Vietnam

Hong Ngo, Jin Y. Shin, Nguyen Viet Nhan, Larry Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

INTRODUCTION Intellectual disabilities are as prevalent in East Asian countries as in the West (0.06%-1.3%). Widespread discrimination against intellectual disabilities in Asia may initiate stigma that places unfair restrictions on the social life of these individuals and their caregivers. We utilised established stigma frameworks to assess the extent to which a child's intellectual disability contributes to the social exclusion of caregivers in Vietnam. MeThODs A mixed quantitative and qualitative approach was employed to examine the experience of social life restriction among parents of children with intellectual disabilities. The child's disability level and restrictions on caregivers' social experiences were assessed among 70 mothers and fathers recruited from schools in Hue City, Vietnam. Qualitative responses describing social exclusion were also recorded. ResUlTs Caregivers reported elevated levels of social exclusion. As hypothesised, parents of children with greater intellectual disability experienced more restrictions on their social life (Beta = 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.27-1.30, standard error = 0.26, p < 0.01). Qualitative analyses indicated that the threatening of core cultural norms (inability to be employed or married upsets community harmony) initiated labelling, social exclusion and efforts to keep the condition secret or withdraw from others. CONClUsION This study is among the first to demonstrate the impacts of intellectual disabilities on caregivers' social functioning in Asia. The findings illustrate how traditional Asian norms initiate stigma, which in turn restricts key social interactions among caregivers. Psycho-educational interventions may address the social domains in which caregivers are impacted and encourage sustained help-seeking among caregivers for their children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)451-457
Number of pages7
JournalSingapore Medical Journal
Volume53
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2012

Fingerprint

Vietnam
Disabled Children
Intellectual Disability
Caregivers
Parents
Life Change Events
Interpersonal Relations
Fathers
Mothers
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Asia
  • Culture
  • Disability
  • Family
  • Stigma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Stigma and restriction on the social life of families of children with intellectual disabilities in Vietnam. / Ngo, Hong; Shin, Jin Y.; Nhan, Nguyen Viet; Yang, Larry.

In: Singapore Medical Journal, Vol. 53, No. 7, 07.2012, p. 451-457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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