Steroid Use in Gay, Bisexual, and Nonidentified Men-Who-Have-Sex-With-Men: Relations to Masculinity, Physical, and Mental Health

Perry N. Halkitis, Robert W. Moeller, Lauren B. DeRaleau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A cross-sectional study of gay, bisexual, and other nongay-identified men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) was undertaken in New York City. We sought to delineate patterns of both injection and noninjection steroid use in the sample of 311 men. Of these men, approximately 11% reported the use of steroids in the 6 months prior to assessment. The majority of these men reported the injection of steroids and had access to needles via prescription. Based on bivariate analyses, steroid users tended to be White, older, and HIV-positive. The men who utilized steroids were also likely to use a variety of illicit substances such as cocaine, as well as erectile dysfunction medications, during the period of assessment. Multivariate modeling determined the likelihood of steroid use was higher among those who were HIV-positive, older, and defined their masculinity in terms of social behavior. These findings suggest that although steroid use in this sample of this population is not widespread, use may be intimately linked to health, mental health, and psychosocial states that characterize the gay community at large.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-115
Number of pages10
JournalPsychology of Men and Masculinity
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

Fingerprint

Masculinity
masculinity
Mental Health
mental health
Steroids
medication
HIV
Injections
social behavior
Social Behavior
cross-sectional study
Erectile Dysfunction
Sexual Minorities
Cocaine
Needles
Prescriptions
Cross-Sectional Studies
health
Health
community

Keywords

  • bisexual
  • drug use
  • gay
  • masculinity
  • steroids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Steroid Use in Gay, Bisexual, and Nonidentified Men-Who-Have-Sex-With-Men : Relations to Masculinity, Physical, and Mental Health. / Halkitis, Perry N.; Moeller, Robert W.; DeRaleau, Lauren B.

In: Psychology of Men and Masculinity, Vol. 9, No. 2, 04.2008, p. 106-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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