Splitting as a focus of couples treatment

Judith P. Siegel

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Abstract

    Current developments in neurophysiology and trauma have re-awakened interest in the reciprocal influences of the interpersonal and intrapsychic domains. Although object relations theory continues to guide clinical practice, its integration into models of best practice has been limited by a lack of empirical study. This paper examines the defense mechanism of splitting in couples from the theoretical, empirical and clinical perspectives in ways that allow for integration with research findings. It is proposed that splitting operates on a continuum from a specific response that is stimulated by anxiety, to a fundamental style of relating that is marked by emotional reactivity, impaired problem solving and relationship instability. Specific treatment interventions that integrate object relations and cognitive perspectives are summarized.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)161-168
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Contemporary Psychotherapy
    Volume38
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 1 2008

    Fingerprint

    Neurophysiology
    Defense Mechanisms
    Practice Guidelines
    Anxiety
    Wounds and Injuries
    Research
    Object Attachment

    Keywords

    • Couples treatment
    • Dyadic splitting
    • Object relations schemas
    • Splitting

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Clinical Psychology
    • Psychiatry and Mental health

    Cite this

    Splitting as a focus of couples treatment. / Siegel, Judith P.

    In: Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy, Vol. 38, No. 3, 01.09.2008, p. 161-168.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Siegel, Judith P. / Splitting as a focus of couples treatment. In: Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy. 2008 ; Vol. 38, No. 3. pp. 161-168.
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