Spectrotemporal modulation provides a unifying framework for auditory cortical asymmetries

Adeen Flinker, Werner K. Doyle, Ashesh D. Mehta, Orrin Devinsky, David Poeppel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The principles underlying functional asymmetries in cortex remain debated. For example, it is accepted that speech is processed bilaterally in auditory cortex, but a left hemisphere dominance emerges when the input is interpreted linguistically. The mechanisms, however, are contested, such as what sound features or processing principles underlie laterality. Recent findings across species (humans, canines and bats) provide converging evidence that spectrotemporal sound features drive asymmetrical responses. Typically, accounts invoke models wherein the hemispheres differ in time–frequency resolution or integration window size. We develop a framework that builds on and unifies prevailing models, using spectrotemporal modulation space. Using signal processing techniques motivated by neural responses, we test this approach, employing behavioural and neurophysiological measures. We show how psychophysical judgements align with spectrotemporal modulations and then characterize the neural sensitivities to temporal and spectral modulations. We demonstrate differential contributions from both hemispheres, with a left lateralization for temporal modulations and a weaker right lateralization for spectral modulations. We argue that representations in the modulation domain provide a more mechanistic basis to account for lateralization in auditory cortex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNature Human Behaviour
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Auditory Cortex
Canidae
Drive

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Spectrotemporal modulation provides a unifying framework for auditory cortical asymmetries. / Flinker, Adeen; Doyle, Werner K.; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Devinsky, Orrin; Poeppel, David.

In: Nature Human Behaviour, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Flinker, Adeen ; Doyle, Werner K. ; Mehta, Ashesh D. ; Devinsky, Orrin ; Poeppel, David. / Spectrotemporal modulation provides a unifying framework for auditory cortical asymmetries. In: Nature Human Behaviour. 2019.
@article{0886030419de4aef9093f5d7bc03d08c,
title = "Spectrotemporal modulation provides a unifying framework for auditory cortical asymmetries",
abstract = "The principles underlying functional asymmetries in cortex remain debated. For example, it is accepted that speech is processed bilaterally in auditory cortex, but a left hemisphere dominance emerges when the input is interpreted linguistically. The mechanisms, however, are contested, such as what sound features or processing principles underlie laterality. Recent findings across species (humans, canines and bats) provide converging evidence that spectrotemporal sound features drive asymmetrical responses. Typically, accounts invoke models wherein the hemispheres differ in time–frequency resolution or integration window size. We develop a framework that builds on and unifies prevailing models, using spectrotemporal modulation space. Using signal processing techniques motivated by neural responses, we test this approach, employing behavioural and neurophysiological measures. We show how psychophysical judgements align with spectrotemporal modulations and then characterize the neural sensitivities to temporal and spectral modulations. We demonstrate differential contributions from both hemispheres, with a left lateralization for temporal modulations and a weaker right lateralization for spectral modulations. We argue that representations in the modulation domain provide a more mechanistic basis to account for lateralization in auditory cortex.",
author = "Adeen Flinker and Doyle, {Werner K.} and Mehta, {Ashesh D.} and Orrin Devinsky and David Poeppel",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41562-019-0548-z",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Nature Human Behaviour",
issn = "2397-3374",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spectrotemporal modulation provides a unifying framework for auditory cortical asymmetries

AU - Flinker, Adeen

AU - Doyle, Werner K.

AU - Mehta, Ashesh D.

AU - Devinsky, Orrin

AU - Poeppel, David

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - The principles underlying functional asymmetries in cortex remain debated. For example, it is accepted that speech is processed bilaterally in auditory cortex, but a left hemisphere dominance emerges when the input is interpreted linguistically. The mechanisms, however, are contested, such as what sound features or processing principles underlie laterality. Recent findings across species (humans, canines and bats) provide converging evidence that spectrotemporal sound features drive asymmetrical responses. Typically, accounts invoke models wherein the hemispheres differ in time–frequency resolution or integration window size. We develop a framework that builds on and unifies prevailing models, using spectrotemporal modulation space. Using signal processing techniques motivated by neural responses, we test this approach, employing behavioural and neurophysiological measures. We show how psychophysical judgements align with spectrotemporal modulations and then characterize the neural sensitivities to temporal and spectral modulations. We demonstrate differential contributions from both hemispheres, with a left lateralization for temporal modulations and a weaker right lateralization for spectral modulations. We argue that representations in the modulation domain provide a more mechanistic basis to account for lateralization in auditory cortex.

AB - The principles underlying functional asymmetries in cortex remain debated. For example, it is accepted that speech is processed bilaterally in auditory cortex, but a left hemisphere dominance emerges when the input is interpreted linguistically. The mechanisms, however, are contested, such as what sound features or processing principles underlie laterality. Recent findings across species (humans, canines and bats) provide converging evidence that spectrotemporal sound features drive asymmetrical responses. Typically, accounts invoke models wherein the hemispheres differ in time–frequency resolution or integration window size. We develop a framework that builds on and unifies prevailing models, using spectrotemporal modulation space. Using signal processing techniques motivated by neural responses, we test this approach, employing behavioural and neurophysiological measures. We show how psychophysical judgements align with spectrotemporal modulations and then characterize the neural sensitivities to temporal and spectral modulations. We demonstrate differential contributions from both hemispheres, with a left lateralization for temporal modulations and a weaker right lateralization for spectral modulations. We argue that representations in the modulation domain provide a more mechanistic basis to account for lateralization in auditory cortex.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062641734&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85062641734&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41562-019-0548-z

DO - 10.1038/s41562-019-0548-z

M3 - Article

JO - Nature Human Behaviour

JF - Nature Human Behaviour

SN - 2397-3374

ER -