Sources of ethnic differences between Asian American and White American college students on measures of depression and social anxiety

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study tested an affect-specific explanation for the Asian and White American differences in depression and social anxiety. Construal of the self as independent or interdependent in relation to others (H. R. Markus and S. Kitayama, 1991) was hypothesized to be 1 possible way in which culture may be expressed in individuals' psychological functioning, which in turn was hypothesized to be linked specifically to social anxiety. College students (N = 348; 183 White Americans and 165 Asian Americans) completed self-report measures of depression, social anxiety, and self-construals. Asian Americans scored significantly higher than White Americans on measures of depression and social anxiety. When the covariance between depression and social anxiety was statistically controlled, ethnicity and self-construal variables were found, as predicted, to be associated with measures of social anxiety but not depression. These findings suggest a more differentiated perspective on the relations between culture, ethnicity, and emotional distress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)52-60
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume106
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1997

Fingerprint

Asian Americans
Anxiety
Depression
Students
Self Report
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

@article{f66f0e51571d4b7babb1c41ec3bfb933,
title = "Sources of ethnic differences between Asian American and White American college students on measures of depression and social anxiety",
abstract = "This study tested an affect-specific explanation for the Asian and White American differences in depression and social anxiety. Construal of the self as independent or interdependent in relation to others (H. R. Markus and S. Kitayama, 1991) was hypothesized to be 1 possible way in which culture may be expressed in individuals' psychological functioning, which in turn was hypothesized to be linked specifically to social anxiety. College students (N = 348; 183 White Americans and 165 Asian Americans) completed self-report measures of depression, social anxiety, and self-construals. Asian Americans scored significantly higher than White Americans on measures of depression and social anxiety. When the covariance between depression and social anxiety was statistically controlled, ethnicity and self-construal variables were found, as predicted, to be associated with measures of social anxiety but not depression. These findings suggest a more differentiated perspective on the relations between culture, ethnicity, and emotional distress.",
author = "Sumie Okazaki",
year = "1997",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1037/0021-843X.106.1.52",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "106",
pages = "52--60",
journal = "Journal of Abnormal Psychology",
issn = "0021-843X",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sources of ethnic differences between Asian American and White American college students on measures of depression and social anxiety

AU - Okazaki, Sumie

PY - 1997/2

Y1 - 1997/2

N2 - This study tested an affect-specific explanation for the Asian and White American differences in depression and social anxiety. Construal of the self as independent or interdependent in relation to others (H. R. Markus and S. Kitayama, 1991) was hypothesized to be 1 possible way in which culture may be expressed in individuals' psychological functioning, which in turn was hypothesized to be linked specifically to social anxiety. College students (N = 348; 183 White Americans and 165 Asian Americans) completed self-report measures of depression, social anxiety, and self-construals. Asian Americans scored significantly higher than White Americans on measures of depression and social anxiety. When the covariance between depression and social anxiety was statistically controlled, ethnicity and self-construal variables were found, as predicted, to be associated with measures of social anxiety but not depression. These findings suggest a more differentiated perspective on the relations between culture, ethnicity, and emotional distress.

AB - This study tested an affect-specific explanation for the Asian and White American differences in depression and social anxiety. Construal of the self as independent or interdependent in relation to others (H. R. Markus and S. Kitayama, 1991) was hypothesized to be 1 possible way in which culture may be expressed in individuals' psychological functioning, which in turn was hypothesized to be linked specifically to social anxiety. College students (N = 348; 183 White Americans and 165 Asian Americans) completed self-report measures of depression, social anxiety, and self-construals. Asian Americans scored significantly higher than White Americans on measures of depression and social anxiety. When the covariance between depression and social anxiety was statistically controlled, ethnicity and self-construal variables were found, as predicted, to be associated with measures of social anxiety but not depression. These findings suggest a more differentiated perspective on the relations between culture, ethnicity, and emotional distress.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031048815&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031048815&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/0021-843X.106.1.52

DO - 10.1037/0021-843X.106.1.52

M3 - Article

C2 - 9103717

AN - SCOPUS:0031048815

VL - 106

SP - 52

EP - 60

JO - Journal of Abnormal Psychology

JF - Journal of Abnormal Psychology

SN - 0021-843X

IS - 1

ER -