Soldiers and wayward women

Gendered citizenship, and migration policy in Argentina, Italy and Spain since 1850

David Cook-Martin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Policies that regulate peoples international movement and their state membership have historically made distinctions based on perceived sexual differences, but little is known about the process by which this has happened. This paper explores how and with what consequences migration and nationality policies have been gendered in two quintessential countries of emigration (Italy and Spain), and in a country of immigrants (Argentina) over a 150-year period. I argue that these migration and nationality policies have reflected the dynamics of the political fields in which they have been crafted. Especially before the Great War, laws and official practices that showed a disproportionate interest in men as soldiers and workers, and in women as mothers and as morally suspect subjects mirrored a dynamic of competition over migrants among these countries. A subsequent harmonization of policies reflected a dynamic of accommodation to the realities of a settled emigrant population and dual nationality. In addition, the administrative mechanisms coupled with these laws have operated differently with respect to men and women. The consequences of these laws and mechanisms have persisted even when the letter of the law has ostensibly become gender neutral.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)571-590
    Number of pages20
    JournalCitizenship Studies
    Volume10
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

    Fingerprint

    migration policy
    citizenship
    nationality
    soldier
    Argentina
    Italy
    Spain
    Law
    migration
    harmonization
    emigration
    accommodation
    migrant
    immigrant
    worker
    gender
    woman
    policy

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Geography, Planning and Development
    • Political Science and International Relations

    Cite this

    Soldiers and wayward women : Gendered citizenship, and migration policy in Argentina, Italy and Spain since 1850. / Cook-Martin, David.

    In: Citizenship Studies, Vol. 10, No. 5, 01.11.2006, p. 571-590.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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