Soil nailing in glacial till: A design guide evaluation based on Irish and American field sites

James Joy, Tom Flahavan, Debra Laefer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The French in-situ earth retaining system soil nailing began in 1970 and benefited greatly from that government's investment in the 1986 study 'Clouterre'. As such, French geology strongly influenced both practice and expectations world wide over the past 4 decades. Yet, recent studies in glacial till, a non-French soil type, have shown significant strength under-estimation using conventionally accepted design approaches. This paper reconsiders skin friction expectations for soil nail installations in till. Installation at 3 till sites (1 American and 2 Irish) are examined in detail. Traditional British, French, and American design methods and parameters are applied. Conventional methods under-predicted capacity by more than 50%, thereby raising serious questions as to the appropriateness of such design guidelines in tills. New correlations based on pile installation design are proposed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEarth Retention Conference 3 - Proceedings of the 2010 Earth Retention Conference
Pages252-261
Number of pages10
Volume384
Edition208 GSP
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event2010 Earth Retention Conference - Earth Retention Conference 3 - Bellevue, WA, United States
Duration: Aug 1 2010Aug 4 2010

Other

Other2010 Earth Retention Conference - Earth Retention Conference 3
CountryUnited States
CityBellevue, WA
Period8/1/108/4/10

Fingerprint

soil nailing
Soils
design method
Nails
soil type
Skin friction
skin
pile
friction
Geology
geology
Piles
Earth (planet)
evaluation
soil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Joy, J., Flahavan, T., & Laefer, D. (2010). Soil nailing in glacial till: A design guide evaluation based on Irish and American field sites. In Earth Retention Conference 3 - Proceedings of the 2010 Earth Retention Conference (208 GSP ed., Vol. 384, pp. 252-261) https://doi.org/10.1061/41128(384)23

Soil nailing in glacial till : A design guide evaluation based on Irish and American field sites. / Joy, James; Flahavan, Tom; Laefer, Debra.

Earth Retention Conference 3 - Proceedings of the 2010 Earth Retention Conference. Vol. 384 208 GSP. ed. 2010. p. 252-261.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Joy, J, Flahavan, T & Laefer, D 2010, Soil nailing in glacial till: A design guide evaluation based on Irish and American field sites. in Earth Retention Conference 3 - Proceedings of the 2010 Earth Retention Conference. 208 GSP edn, vol. 384, pp. 252-261, 2010 Earth Retention Conference - Earth Retention Conference 3, Bellevue, WA, United States, 8/1/10. https://doi.org/10.1061/41128(384)23
Joy J, Flahavan T, Laefer D. Soil nailing in glacial till: A design guide evaluation based on Irish and American field sites. In Earth Retention Conference 3 - Proceedings of the 2010 Earth Retention Conference. 208 GSP ed. Vol. 384. 2010. p. 252-261 https://doi.org/10.1061/41128(384)23
Joy, James ; Flahavan, Tom ; Laefer, Debra. / Soil nailing in glacial till : A design guide evaluation based on Irish and American field sites. Earth Retention Conference 3 - Proceedings of the 2010 Earth Retention Conference. Vol. 384 208 GSP. ed. 2010. pp. 252-261
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