Socioeconomic inequalities in health in older adults in Brazil and England

M. Fernanda Lima-Costa, Cesar De Oliveira, James MacInko, Michael Marmot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We examined socioeconomic inequalities in health among older adults in England and Brazil. Methods. We analyzed nationally representative samples of residents aged 50 years and older in 2008 data from the Brazilian National Household Survey (n = 75 527) and the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (n = 9589). We estimated prevalence ratios for self-rated health, functional limitations, and reported chronic diseases, by education level and household income tertiles. Results. Brazilians reported worse health than did English respondents. Country-specific differences were higher among the poorest, but also affected the wealthiest persons. We observed a strong inverse gradient of similar magnitude across education and household income levels for most health indicators in each country. Prevalence ratios (lowest vs highest education level) of poor self-rated health were 3.24 in Brazil and 3.50 in England; having 2 or more functional limitations, 1.81 in Brazil and 1.96 in England; and having 1 or more diseases, 1.14 in Brazil and 1.36 in England. Conclusions. Socioeconomic inequalities in health affect both populations, despite a less pronounced absolute difference in household income and education in Brazil than in England.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1535-1541
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume102
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012

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England
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Health
Education
Health Status
Longitudinal Studies
Chronic Disease
Population
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Socioeconomic inequalities in health in older adults in Brazil and England. / Lima-Costa, M. Fernanda; De Oliveira, Cesar; MacInko, James; Marmot, Michael.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 102, No. 8, 08.2012, p. 1535-1541.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lima-Costa, MF, De Oliveira, C, MacInko, J & Marmot, M 2012, 'Socioeconomic inequalities in health in older adults in Brazil and England', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 102, no. 8, pp. 1535-1541. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2012.300765
Lima-Costa, M. Fernanda ; De Oliveira, Cesar ; MacInko, James ; Marmot, Michael. / Socioeconomic inequalities in health in older adults in Brazil and England. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2012 ; Vol. 102, No. 8. pp. 1535-1541.
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