Socioeconomic factors and suicide

An analysis of 18 industrialized countries for the years 1983 through 2007

Alfred Barth, Leopold Soegner, Timo Gnambs, Michael Kundi, Andreas Reiner, Robert Winker

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Objective: To evaluate the association between socioeconomic factors and suicide rates. Methods: Analysis of time series of suicide rates, gross domestic product, unemployment rates, labor force participation, and divorce rates of 18 countries are analyzed by the application of panel-vector error correction models. Main outcome measures are the association between the socioeconomic factors and suicide rates. Results: Decreasing economic growth and increasing divorce rates are significantly associated with increasing suicide rates in men. For women, increasing economic growth, increasing unemployment, and increasing divorce rates are significantly associated with increasing suicides. Increasing female labor force participation is associated with decreasing suicides. Conclusion: Socioeconomic factors are associated with suicide rates. However, this relationship differs by sex. The current results provide a strong argument that suicide prevention strategies must include the monitoring of socioeconomic development.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)313-317
    Number of pages5
    JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
    Volume53
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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    Developed Countries
    Suicide
    Divorce
    Unemployment
    Economic Development
    Gross Domestic Product
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

    Cite this

    Socioeconomic factors and suicide : An analysis of 18 industrialized countries for the years 1983 through 2007. / Barth, Alfred; Soegner, Leopold; Gnambs, Timo; Kundi, Michael; Reiner, Andreas; Winker, Robert.

    In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 53, No. 3, 01.01.2011, p. 313-317.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Barth, Alfred ; Soegner, Leopold ; Gnambs, Timo ; Kundi, Michael ; Reiner, Andreas ; Winker, Robert. / Socioeconomic factors and suicide : An analysis of 18 industrialized countries for the years 1983 through 2007. In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 53, No. 3. pp. 313-317.
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