Sociodemographic and Psychosocial Predictors of VIP Attendance in Smart Beginnings Through 6 Months

Effectively Targeting At-Risk Mothers in Early Visits

Elizabeth B. Miller, Caitlin F. Canfield, Pamela Morris, Daniel S. Shaw, Carolyn Brockmeyer Cates, Alan L. Mendelsohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Past research on predictors of participation in early childhood parenting programs suggest that families experiencing higher levels of sociodemographic adversity (e.g., younger maternal age, single parenthood, lower income or education) are less likely to participate in parenting programs. This is significant, as it may indicate that those most in need of additional support are the least likely to receive it. Data from a randomized control trial (RCT) of Smart Beginnings, an integrated, tiered model for school readiness, were used to explore predictors of attendance in Video Interaction Project (VIP) through 6 months. VIP is a primary preventive intervention delivered in tandem with pediatric well-child visits, aimed at reducing income-based disparities in early child development through promotion of responsive parent-child interactions. Using Poisson distribution models (N = 403; treatment arm, n = 201), we find that demographic, socioeconomic status (SES), and psychosocial variables are associated with program attendance but not always in the expected direction. While analyses show that first-time mothers have higher levels of program attendance as expected, we find that less-educated mothers and those with lower parenting self-efficacy have higher levels of attendance as well. The latter findings may imply that the VIP intervention is, by some indicators, effectively targeting families who are more challenging to engage and retain. Implications for pediatric-based interventions with population-level accessibility are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPrevention Science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Parenting
Mothers
Poisson Distribution
Pediatrics
Maternal Age
Self Efficacy
Child Development
Social Class
Demography
Education
Research
Population
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Interactions
  • Parent-child
  • Participation
  • Pediatric-based

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Sociodemographic and Psychosocial Predictors of VIP Attendance in Smart Beginnings Through 6 Months : Effectively Targeting At-Risk Mothers in Early Visits. / Miller, Elizabeth B.; Canfield, Caitlin F.; Morris, Pamela; Shaw, Daniel S.; Cates, Carolyn Brockmeyer; Mendelsohn, Alan L.

In: Prevention Science, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, Elizabeth B. ; Canfield, Caitlin F. ; Morris, Pamela ; Shaw, Daniel S. ; Cates, Carolyn Brockmeyer ; Mendelsohn, Alan L. / Sociodemographic and Psychosocial Predictors of VIP Attendance in Smart Beginnings Through 6 Months : Effectively Targeting At-Risk Mothers in Early Visits. In: Prevention Science. 2019.
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